Author Topic: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?  (Read 342 times)

Thanisaro85

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    • Reverend father Jaran, Pramote. Theravada
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Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« on: June 11, 2020, 01:08:22 AM »
Few days back my anxiety arised again as I transferred some money to a online shop to secure some stuffs due to contactless policy in covid situation, I had never deal with this shop before and suddenly all the funny thoughts of faulty transactions and shop denying receiving came in and thus my anxiety mode kicks in, like before.

I told myself to be mindful of the feeling and sensation, that moment when mindfulfulness were on the body and mind, the anxiety feeling was interrupted. But of course the feelings crept in in seconds when the mind went back to thinking about the events. I repeated the mindfulness on feelings and sensations a few times and try not to think about the events before I went to sleep.

The recurring of the anxiety feeling at that moment and how I interrupted it with mindfulness momentary(successfully but with a bit of unwillingness)). It gave me a thought, how much I wanted to part with anxiety? Do we succumb to the habitual torment from these feelings? Or are we sincerely, truthfully wanted the cessation of suffering?

If we had been guarding our mind and body with mindfulness diligently and willingness to let go those 5 aggregates, liberation is not far...

Regards



« Last Edit: June 11, 2020, 01:13:04 AM by Thanisaro85 »
A Mind Unshaken, when touches by worldy matter, sorrowless, secure and dustless, this is the ultimate great blessing~ Mangala Sutta

Dhamma

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Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2020, 02:58:42 AM »
Thank you so much for that, Thanisaro. 

I struggle with terrible social anxiety, even though I am not shy. Certain social situations make me have anxiety attacks, which lead to embarrassment in front of others. I literally feel as if I cannot speak as my heart pounds and my throat feels like it's swelling shut. I wasn't like this when I was younger, so I don't know what happened to me. LOL.

I do noting of my sensations and thoughts when situations arise, but because I am so consumed with embarrassing myself, I cannot concentrate to feel my thoughts and feelings in the moment. The terrible anxiety feeling only lasts for 30-60 seconds (dizzy, light-headed, etc.), but it's enough to really, really embarrass myself.  I literally become paralyzed for a very brief time. The triggers have to do with feeling uncomfortable around certain kinds of people, fearing questions they may ask me, impolite comments, different points of views, etc. I am not like this with all people in all situations; in fact, sometimes I very social, telling jokes non-stop, etc.

I fear the fear of anxiety gripping me. It's like I am a mouse on a wheel - and I cannot get off of it.  Sometimes, I make the other person uncomfortable because of my inability to talk, etc. I have to pretend illness at times. I literally shut down on people for like 30-60 seconds at times, anticipating the dreadful questions, awkwardness, etc.

It is even difficult for me to talk about this on here. I tried to analyze and rationalize the fear, but I cannot. I don't know what happened to me for me to become this way in certain social situations.  :'(

 
« Last Edit: June 11, 2020, 03:01:48 AM by Dhamma »

stillpointdancer

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Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2020, 12:35:19 PM »
I have similar feelings, but became a teacher anyway. Imagine what it's like to feel such anxiety and have to put yourself in the firing line every day as the main part of your job. For me, I resigned to looking and sounding like an idiot, my every mannerism being treated as an object of fun to some child or other, and from them on came to terms with it. Over the years I started to develop strategies with adults too, especially in the kind of formal/informal gatherings with school governors and parents, but also in a more social setting. Once I found it, meditation and the Buddhist path helped a lot. It changed how I saw and related to others with mindfulness practice kicking in at such times, which helped me understand what was going on around me. I found that most people really wanted to talk about themselves, so that strategies which encouraged this helped me develop the confidence to deal with most situations.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Thanisaro85

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  • When thoughts, sensations, feelings arise,know it
    • Reverend father Jaran, Pramote. Theravada
    • Still breathing.
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2020, 01:45:56 PM »
Thank you so much for that, Thanisaro. 


It is even difficult for me to talk about this on here. I tried to analyze and rationalize the fear, but I cannot. I don't know what happened to me for me to become this way in certain social situations.  :'(

I can feel you, but we need use our learning on meditation to overcome or minimise this situation, every situation is a practice ground for us.  I failed a lot of time to overcome anxiety for the past few years but I have seen some improvement as and when. It is not a gradual going up type of graph though, it's like I thought I succeeded in overcome them, but the next events may be worse for me, and then the next is good again. I am not expecting myself to be free from these illness though, but rather let this body and mind free....for good.

Just remember, it may come a times where you can see the feeling and sensations, but whether you would like to interrupt it with mindfulness or not is another hurdle. The recurring habits can be quite strong and we may succumb to it . So the best way is to keep aware of our body and mind every day, to become habitual too.
A Mind Unshaken, when touches by worldy matter, sorrowless, secure and dustless, this is the ultimate great blessing~ Mangala Sutta

Thanisaro85

  • Member
  • When thoughts, sensations, feelings arise,know it
    • Reverend father Jaran, Pramote. Theravada
    • Still breathing.
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2020, 01:56:29 PM »
I have similar feelings, but became a teacher anyway. Imagine what it's like to feel such anxiety and have to put yourself in the firing line every day as the main part of your job. For me, I resigned to looking and sounding like an idiot, my every mannerism being treated as an object of fun to some child or other, and from them on came to terms with it. Over the years I started to develop strategies with adults too, especially in the kind of formal/informal gatherings with school governors and parents, but also in a more social setting. Once I found it, meditation and the Buddhist path helped a lot. It changed how I saw and related to others with mindfulness practice kicking in at such times, which helped me understand what was going on around me. I found that most people really wanted to talk about themselves, so that strategies which encouraged this helped me develop the confidence to deal with most situations.

Sadhu Anumodana, let us rejoice for your victory to overcome anxiety.  There is a special thing about meditations, I don't know how to describe it, but it seems to allow us to see things at a very focus and slow motion angle of the problems, which allow us to be able to resolve the issue at that moment. Do you think this is how it help you? 

A Mind Unshaken, when touches by worldy matter, sorrowless, secure and dustless, this is the ultimate great blessing~ Mangala Sutta

stillpointdancer

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    • Exploring the results of 30 years of meditating
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2020, 10:51:58 AM »
Hi Thanisaro. Yes, meditation helped change my relationship with myself and the world and to be in the moment, and to enjoy it.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Emoint

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Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2020, 12:50:28 PM »
Hi Guys,
just checking out different threads. What you describe are in emotional intelligence terms called road blocks. I will attach the quick stress release article that, if nothing else, you have been made aware of it. For my own quick stress release, I have an image of me and a close friend sniffing the cabbage plant, its a jasmine type fragrance and the memory and the smell combined, quickly negate the stress I can feel building up after a thought pattern has established itself. I've got so good at it, the thought process doesn't get the time of day anymore, i cut it off at the point between its seed and first shoots. I have been shown that due to traumas the messages get diverted through to the migala, this is where the fight flight or freeze area of the brain sits. I think this is whats happening with you.
All i do is think of the cabbage plant image with me and my friend smelling the bloom and the stress or build up goes away instantly now. I also have strong mental images, for the traces of emotional memory that still get passed through my migala rather than straight to my frontal lobe. Even if you don't believe the article at least you have been shown.
You already recognise when the stress is building heres how to neutralise it. I also carry an essential oil 10ml bottle of jasmine for instant smell release from the anxiety. Good news is my mindfullness is rewiring my brain to not even go near the Migala. I come from a complex ptsd upbringing so can vouch for its effectiveness. hope it helps but i know nothing

Quick Stress Relief
Learn how to use the power of your senses to relieve stress on the spot and stay calm, productive, and focused—no matter what life throws at you.
Grey cat with eyes closed, its chin tilted up as a woman's finger scratches underneath it
What is the fastest way to relieve stress?

There are countless techniques for managing stress. Yoga, mindfulness meditation, and exercise are just a few examples of stress-relieving activities that work wonders. But in the heat of the moment, during a high-pressured job interview, for example, or a disagreement with your spouse, you can’t just excuse yourself to meditate or take a long walk. In these situations, you need something more immediate and accessible.

One of the speediest and most reliable ways to stamp out stress is to engage one or more of your senses—sight, sound, taste, smell, touch—or through movement. Since everyone is different, you’ll need to do some experimenting to discover which technique works best for you—but the payoff is huge. You can stay calm, productive, and focused when you know how to quickly relieve stress.

Social interaction is your body’s most evolved and surefire strategy for regulating the nervous system. Talking face-to-face with a relaxed and caring listener can help you quickly calm down and release tension. Although you can’t always have a pal to lean on in the middle of a stressful situation, maintaining a network of close relationships is vital for your mental health. Between sensory-based stress relief and good listeners, you’ll have your bases covered.
Tip 1: Recognize when you’re stressed

It might seem obvious that you’d know when you’re stressed, but many of us spend so much time in a frazzled state that we’ve forgotten what it feels like when our nervous systems are in balance: when we’re calm yet still alert and focused. If this is you, you can recognize when you’re stressed by listening to your body. When you’re tired, your eyes feel heavy and you might rest your head on your hand. When you’re happy, you laugh easily. And when you’re stressed, your body lets you know that, too. Get in the habit of paying attention to your body’s clues.

Observe your muscles and insides. Are your muscles tense or sore? Is your stomach tight, cramped, or aching? Are your hands or jaw clenched?

Observe your breath. Is your breathing shallow? Place one hand on your belly, the other on your chest. Watch your hands rise and fall with each breath. Notice when you breathe fully or when you “forget” to breathe.
Tip 2: Identify your stress response

Internally, we all respond the same way to the “fight-or-flight” stress response: your blood pressure rises, your heart pumps faster, and your muscles constrict. Your body works hard and drains your immune system. Externally, however, people respond to stress in different ways.

The best way to quickly relieve stress often relates to your specific stress response:

Overexcited stress response: If you tend to become angry, agitated, overly emotional, or keyed up under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that quiet you down.

Underexcited stress response: If you tend to become depressed, withdrawn, or spaced out under stress, you will respond best to stress relief activities that are stimulating and energizing.
The immobilization or “frozen” stress response

Do you freeze when under stress? The immobilization stress response is often associated with
a past history of trauma. When faced with stressful situations, you may find yourself totally stuck and unable to take action. Your challenge is to break free of your “frozen” state by rebooting your nervous system and reactivating the body’s natural “fight-or-flight” stress response. Physical movement that engages both your arms and legs, such as walking, swimming, running, dancing, climbing, or tai chi, can be particularly helpful. As you move, focus on your body and the sensations you feel in your limbs rather than on your thoughts. This mindfulness element can help your nervous system become “unstuck” and move on.
Tip 3: Bring your senses to the rescue

To use your senses to quickly relieve stress, you first need to identify the sensory experiences that work best for you. This can require some experimentation. As you employ different senses, note how quickly your stress levels drop. And be as precise as possible. What is the specific kind of sound or type of movement that affects you the most? For example, if you’re a music lover, listen to many different artists and types of music until you find the song that instantly lifts and relaxes you.
Senses infographic

Explore a variety of sensory experiences so that no matter where you are, you’ll always have a tool to relieve stress.

The examples listed below are intended to be a jumping-off point. Let your imagination run free and come up with additional things to try. When you find the right sensory technique, you’ll know it!
Sight

    Look at a cherished photo or a favorite memento.
    Use a plant or flowers to enliven your work space.
    Enjoy the beauty of nature: a garden, the beach, a park, or your own backyard.
    Surround yourself with colors that lift your spirits.
    Close your eyes and picture a place that feels peaceful and rejuvenating.

Smell

    Light a scented candle or burn some incense.
    Experiment with different essential oils.
    Smell the roses or another type of flower.
    Enjoy clean, fresh air in the great outdoors.
    Spritz on your favorite perfume or cologne.

Touch

    Wrap yourself in a warm blanket.
    Pet a dog or cat.
    Hold a comforting object (a stuffed animal, a favorite memento).
    Give yourself a hand or neck massage.
    Wear clothing that feels soft against your skin.

Taste

Slowly savoring a favorite treat can be very relaxing, but mindless eating will only add to your stress and your waistline. The key is to indulge your sense of taste mindfully and in moderation.

    Chew a piece of sugarless gum.
    Indulge in a small piece of dark chocolate.
    Sip a steaming cup of coffee or tea or a refreshing cold drink.
    Eat a perfectly ripe piece of fruit.
    Enjoy a healthy, crunchy snack (celery, carrots, or trail mix).

Movement

If you tend to shut down when you’re under stress or have experienced trauma, stress-relieving activities that get you moving may be particularly helpful.

    Run in place or jump up and down.
    Dance around.
    Stretch or roll your head in circles.
    Go for a short walk.
    Squeeze a rubbery stress ball.

Sound

    Sing or play a favorite tune.
    Listen to calming or uplifting music.
    Tune in to the soundtrack of nature—crashing waves, the wind rustling the trees, birds singing.
    Buy a small fountain, so you can enjoy the soothing sound of running water in your home or office.
    Hang wind chimes near an open window.

Vocal toning

As strange as it may sound, vocal toning is a special technique that reduces the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol. Try sneaking off to a quiet place to spend a few minutes toning before a meeting with your boss and see how much more relaxed and focused you feel. It works by exercising the tiny muscles of the inner ear that help you detect the higher frequencies of human speech that impart emotion and tell you what someone is really trying to say. Not only will you feel more relaxed in that meeting, you’ll also be better able to understand what he’s trying to communicate.

How to tone: Sit up straight and simply make “mmmm” sounds with your lips together and teeth slightly apart. Experiment by changing the pitch and volume until you experience a pleasant vibration in your face and, eventually, your heart and stomach.
Tip 4: Find sensory inspiration

Having trouble identifying sensory techniques that work for you? Look for inspiration around you, from your sights as you go about your day to memories from your past.

Memories. Think back to what you did as a child to calm down. If you had a blanket or stuffed toy, you might benefit from tactile stimulation. Try tying a textured scarf around your neck before an appointment or keeping a piece of soft suede in your pocket.

Watch others. Observing how others deal with stress can give you valuable insight. Baseball players often pop gum before going up to bat. Singers often chat up the crowd before performing. Ask people you know how they stay focused under pressure.

Parents. Think back to what your parents did to blow off steam. Did your mother feel more relaxed after a long walk? Did your father work in the yard after a hard day?

The power of imagination. Once drawing upon your sensory toolbox becomes habit, try simply imagining vivid sensations when stress strikes. The memory of your baby’s face will have the same calming or energizing effects on your brain as seeing her photo. When you can recall a strong sensation, you’ll never be without a quick stress relief tool.
Take a break from technology

Taking a short hiatus from the television, computer, and cell phone will give you insight on what your senses respond to best.

    Try tuning into relaxing music instead of talk radio during your commute. Or try riding in silence for 10 minutes.
    Stuck in a long line at the grocery store? Instead of talking on your phone, take a moment to people watch. Pay attention to what you hear and see.
    Instead of checking email while waiting for a meeting, take a few deep breaths, look out the window, or sip some tea.
    While waiting for an appointment, resist the urge to text and give yourself a hand massage instead.

Tip 5: Make quick stress relief a habit

It’s not easy to remember to use your senses in the middle of a mini—or or not so mino—crisis. At first, it will feel easier to just give into pressure and tense up. But with time, calling upon your senses will become second nature. Think of the process like learning to drive or play golf. You don’t master the skill in one lesson; you have to practice until it becomes second nature. Eventually you’ll feel like you’re forgetting something if you don’t tune into your body during challenging times. Here’s how to make it habit:

Start small. Instead of testing your quick stress relief tools on a source of major stress, start with a predictable low-level source of stress, like cooking dinner at the end of a long day or sitting down to pay bills.

Identify and target. Think of just one low-level stressor that you know will occur several times a week, such as commuting. Vow to target that stressor with quick stress relief every time. After a few weeks, target a second stressor and so on.

Test-drive sensory input. If you are practicing quick stress relief on your commute to work, bring a scented handkerchief with you one day, try music another day, and try a movement the next day. Keep experimenting until you find a clear winner.

Have fun with the process. If something doesn’t work, don’t force it. Move on until you find what works best for you. It should be pleasurable and noticeably calming.

Talk about it. Telling friends or family members about the stress-relief strategies you’re trying out will help you integrate them into your life. As an added bonus, it’s bound to start an interesting conversation: everyone relates to the topic of stress.
Tip 6: Practice wherever you are

The best part of sensory-based strategies is the awareness that you have control. No matter where you are or what you’re doing, quick stress relief is within arm’s reach.
Quick stress relief at home

Entertaining. Prevent pre-party jitters by playing lively music. Light candles. The flicker and scent will stimulate your senses. Wear clothes that make you feel relaxed and confident.

Kitchen. Ease kitchen stress by breathing in the scent of every ingredient. Delight in the delicate texture of an eggshell. Appreciate the weight of an onion.

Children and relationships. Prevent losing your cool during a spousal spat by squeezing the tips of your thumb and forefinger together. When your toddler has a tantrum, rub lotion into your hands and breathe in the scent.

Sleep. Too stressed to snooze? Try using a white noise machine for background sound or a humidifier with a diffuser for a light scent in the air.

Creating a sanctuary. If clutter is upsetting, spend 10 minutes each day to tidy. Display photos and images that make you feel happy. Throw open the curtains and let in natural light.
Quick stress relief at work
Woman stretching arms and hands with interlocked fingers in front of her

Meetings. During stressful sessions, stay connected to your breath. Massage the tips of your fingers. Wiggle your toes. Sip coffee.

On the phone. Inhale something energizing, like lemon, ginger, peppermint. While talking, stand up or pace back and forth to burn off excess energy, or take calls outside when possible.

On the computer. Work standing up. Do knee-bends in 10-minute intervals. Suck on a peppermint. Sip tea.

Lunch breaks. Take a walk around the block or in the parking lot. Listen to soothing music while eating. Chat with a colleague.

Your workspace. Place family photos on your desk or mementos that remind you of your life outside the office.
Quick stress relief on the go

In traffic. Play music or listen to an audiobook. Take a different route to see something new. Do neck-rolls at stoplights. Sing in the car to stay awake and happy.

Public transportation. Take a break from reading, cell conversations, and music to tune into the sights and sounds around you. Try noticing something new, even if you’re on the same old bus ride.

Running errands. Wear a special perfume or lotion so you can enjoy it while you rush from place to place. Carry a stress ball in your pocket. Take a mental “snapshot” or “postcard” at each destination.

Waiting in lines. Instead of worrying about time slipping away, focus on your breathing. People watch. Chat with the person ahead of you. Chew a stick of minty gum.

Dhamma

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    • I practice Vipassana meditation + mental noting (mostly Theravadan)
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2020, 06:08:54 PM »
  I can feel you, but we need use our learning on meditation to overcome or minimise this situation, every situation is a practice ground for us.  I failed a lot of time to overcome anxiety for the past few years but I have seen some improvement as and when. It is not a gradual going up type of graph though, it's like I thought I succeeded in overcome them, but the next events may be worse for me, and then the next is good again. I am not expecting myself to be free from these illness though, but rather let this body and mind free....for good.

Just remember, it may come a times where you can see the feeling and sensations, but whether you would like to interrupt it with mindfulness or not is another hurdle. The recurring habits can be quite strong and we may succumb to it . So the best way is to keep aware of our body and mind every day, to become habitual too.

Thank you so much, dear friend, for words of wisdom and encouragement.

Just when I think my anxiety has gotten better, it skyrockets. Then, I crash into despair.  I suppose we need to let go of the idea of progress. We need to transcend the ideas of right or wrong, better or worse, etc.; and we need to transcend the non-existent "I". We need to learn to just be without judgment. But this is so, so hard to do, or so it seems.

I forget what Buddhist teacher said this, but I remember hearing once: "We must dare to trust ourselves in our practice."  I don't think that I have ever dared to trust myself. Also, I fear letting go.  It is as if I hold on to the anxiety because I want to somehow cling to suffering. I am addicted to suffering. When will I finally let go????

Peace and enlightenment to all.




Thanisaro85

  • Member
  • When thoughts, sensations, feelings arise,know it
    • Reverend father Jaran, Pramote. Theravada
    • Still breathing.
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2020, 09:39:18 AM »
Hi Guys,


Hi Emoint,

Thanks for sharing these , we could go parallel on both meditations and the methods you provided.
A Mind Unshaken, when touches by worldy matter, sorrowless, secure and dustless, this is the ultimate great blessing~ Mangala Sutta

Emoint

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    • Emotional intelligence
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2020, 07:11:26 AM »
Thankyou for your responses. I like this forum there are no egos. Or ' I need to be the most right or wise.' It reminds me of the line from wish you were here. 'we're just two goldfish swimming in a bowl year after year'. Now i have become aware of my breath and I see that as a part of my soul, I am happy to be a goldfish. Dhamma, you keep enjoying suffering, perhaps it is your version of luangpor pramotes concept of the sore bum for sitting too long. Perhaps you engage too much in conversation and the panic attack is a side effect. Maybe it is upright concentration being bore whilst socially engaging? Watching that video by him has had a profound effect on how i can clearly see how western philosophy has itso wn version of meditation. Lots to ponder on.

Dhamma

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  • Who are you?
    • I practice Vipassana meditation + mental noting (mostly Theravadan)
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2020, 06:23:21 PM »
Dhamma, you keep enjoying suffering, perhaps it is your version of luangpor pramotes concept of the sore bum for sitting too long. Perhaps you engage too much in conversation and the panic attack is a side effect. Maybe it is upright concentration being bore whilst socially engaging?

Hi, Emoint! I hope you are doing well.

Would you mind explaining what you mean? I am not sure I am following you.

Thank you so very much!

Peace

Emoint

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Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #11 on: June 15, 2020, 09:57:51 AM »
Hi Dhamma,
Sorry you got caught up in my processing luang por pramote. I was explaining very poorly, that when you get the 60 seconds of what i see as panic attacks, that maybe by products of meditation comeing out in different form or when certain similar environments present themselves. Por Pramote talks about wisdom being gained through mindfullness and then upright concentration that lead onto the 3 states.Before he returned to the calming mindful meditation he had heart pulpitations that stressed him out, he called it suffering (i think). He had been so engrossed in upright concentration, it took its toll. I wonder if your 30 to 60 seconds of anxiety, like por pramotes heart pulpitations are a by product of your journey in meditation. I hope I'm now clear. Like the soreness when sitting too long that Por pramote mentions to distinguish between, sorry i can't quite recall the point he was trying to make but it was relevant to the topic a third part of us manifested in your panic attacks. 34.37 mins in the 'mindfulness meditation for everyday life' he presented. By trying to be understanding I think i have muddled it up. Apologies Dhamma.

Thanisaro85

  • Member
  • When thoughts, sensations, feelings arise,know it
    • Reverend father Jaran, Pramote. Theravada
    • Still breathing.
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2020, 12:14:38 AM »
Hi Dhamma,
Sorry you got caught up in my processing luang por pramote. I was explaining very poorly, that when you get the 60 seconds of what i see as panic attacks, that maybe by products of meditation comeing out in different form or when certain similar environments present themselves. Por Pramote talks about wisdom being gained through mindfullness and then upright concentration that lead onto the 3 states.Before he returned to the calming mindful meditation he had heart pulpitations that stressed him out, he called it suffering (i think). He had been so engrossed in upright concentration, it took its toll. I wonder if your 30 to 60 seconds of anxiety, like por pramotes heart pulpitations are a by product of your journey in meditation. I hope I'm now clear. Like the soreness when sitting too long that Por pramote mentions to distinguish between, sorry i can't quite recall the point he was trying to make but it was relevant to the topic a third part of us manifested in your panic attacks. 34.37 mins in the 'mindfulness meditation for everyday life' he presented. By trying to be understanding I think i have muddled it up. Apologies Dhamma.


Hi Lance, perhap you would like to link the video which you mentioned 34.37 mins? There are a few videos of Por Pramote here.🙂
A Mind Unshaken, when touches by worldy matter, sorrowless, secure and dustless, this is the ultimate great blessing~ Mangala Sutta

Dhamma

  • Member
  • Who are you?
    • I practice Vipassana meditation + mental noting (mostly Theravadan)
Re: Anxiety, are you willing to part with it?
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2020, 01:21:25 AM »
Hi Dhamma,
Sorry you got caught up in my processing luang por pramote. I was explaining very poorly, that when you get the 60 seconds of what i see as panic attacks, that maybe by products of meditation comeing out in different form or when certain similar environments present themselves. Por Pramote talks about wisdom being gained through mindfullness and then upright concentration that lead onto the 3 states.Before he returned to the calming mindful meditation he had heart pulpitations that stressed him out, he called it suffering (i think). He had been so engrossed in upright concentration, it took its toll. I wonder if your 30 to 60 seconds of anxiety, like por pramotes heart pulpitations are a by product of your journey in meditation. I hope I'm now clear. Like the soreness when sitting too long that Por pramote mentions to distinguish between, sorry i can't quite recall the point he was trying to make but it was relevant to the topic a third part of us manifested in your panic attacks. 34.37 mins in the 'mindfulness meditation for everyday life' he presented. By trying to be understanding I think i have muddled it up. Apologies Dhamma.

No need for apologies, dear friend.  ;)

Yes,  I think you are correct: I become so obsessed/engrossed with the idea of panicking, that it happens almost every time a certain situation arises. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy.  I concentrate so hard on having a panic attack, that it happens. I fear the embarrassment that results from having one -- not the panic attack itself.

Thank you for your helpful advice.

Please take care.


 

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