Author Topic: Military Medical Corps  (Read 459 times)

soparklioin

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Military Medical Corps
« on: April 01, 2019, 01:13:48 PM »
I'm a medical professional and considering joining a reserve medical corps as a way to give back to my country.  Is this against the dhamma?  They also perform humanitarian missions. :-\

stillpointdancer

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2019, 11:09:33 AM »
There are lots of Zen stories about why Zen is even more important to those putting themselves in challenging situations. For your personal development I suggest you read up on protection practices where the meditation is aimed at mental stability and mental well-being.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

dharma bum

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2019, 03:51:19 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buddhist_ethics#War

The above link appears to show that people have varying degrees of strictness when it comes to soldiering.

I personally don't think there is anything unethical or unBuddhist in signing up in the medical corps because (I believe) you would be required to serve all wounded, including the 'enemy', so you'd be a doctor first.
Mostly ignorant

Nicky

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2019, 04:41:09 AM »
To give back to my country. 

Who is your country's military protecting? And from which threat?

They also perform humanitarian missions.

Really? Which country performs military humanitarian missions?  Russia?  Are you Russian? Are you going to Syria or Venezuela on a humanitarian mission to save people from American military & economic terrorism?

 :angel:

Nicky

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2019, 04:45:08 AM »
I personally don't think there is anything unethical or unBuddhist in signing up in the medical corps because (I believe) you would be required to serve all wounded, including the 'enemy', so you'd be a doctor first.

Great accuse, like this:  https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3315347/Watch-heart-pounding-moment-Israeli-commandos-save-Islamic-militants-Syrian-warzone-risking-lives-sworn-enemies.html

For this: https://www.timesofisrael.com/yaalon-i-would-prefer-islamic-state-to-iran-in-syria/

::)
« Last Edit: April 03, 2019, 04:46:52 AM by Nicky »

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2019, 07:42:51 AM »
Really? Which country performs military humanitarian missions?  Russia?  Are you Russian? Are you going to Syria or Venezuela on a humanitarian mission to save people from American military & economic terrorism?

 :angel:
I'm from New Zealand and the majority of our military actions involve humanitarian aid or regional policing assistance through the Pacific. That's not to say we're total angels and have had involvement in Iraq and Afghanistan but that is mostly in non combat roles.

 I don't think we're overly unique in that regard but maybe we are.

In regards to the opening post I can't see an issue if you're a non combatant.

raushan

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2019, 11:09:00 PM »
In one of the S N Goenka discourse I heard it's not entirely true that Buddhsits never fought war or anything. There had been great buddhist and zen warriors in China and Japan.
I only know one Buddhist king in India Ashoka. Actually He was Hindu. He was a great warrior. But in his later stage of life he fought no war. May be He didn't need. He already had entire India, current Malaysia, Afganisthan, Pakistan in his territory.

Shouldn't we defend ourselves or our country if it is absolute necessary.

By fighting or killing one terrorist you will save many innocent people. Isn't it saving life instead of killing?

It's already very hard to have great person in the word. If someone try to kill a great person but if you fight and save him. Then you will do the good service for many people. One Buddha came and so many people still reaping benefits from him.


stillpointdancer

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2019, 11:18:11 AM »
I've studied a lot about PTSD when people leave military service. My father was in the second wave of the D Day landings and fought his way, after recovering from wounds, into Germany. He was a gentle person but kept to himself the trauma he continued to suffer, especially the nightmares he had of being under shellfire and rocket attacks (I learned this later from mom, who often found herself being pushed down the bed, or trench as he thought it was, in the middle of the night).

My point is that studies of mindfulness training in the US military show that people who are to be put in harms way do benefit from meditation, which should be offered to anyone about to serve in areas of conflict.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

dharma bum

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2019, 01:30:51 PM »
You could also make the case that the military needs more people who are mindful and compassionate.
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stillpointdancer

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2019, 08:25:58 PM »
You could also make the case that the military needs more people who are mindful and compassionate.
Absolutely right
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

raushan

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2019, 11:56:36 PM »
I've studied a lot about PTSD when people leave military service. My father was in the second wave of the D Day landings and fought his way, after recovering from wounds, into Germany. He was a gentle person but kept to himself the trauma he continued to suffer, especially the nightmares he had of being under shellfire and rocket attacks (I learned this later from mom, who often found herself being pushed down the bed, or trench as he thought it was, in the middle of the night).

My point is that studies of mindfulness training in the US military show that people who are to be put in harms way do benefit from meditation, which should be offered to anyone about to serve in areas of conflict.

Yes. This makes sense. There are lot of military person who came back home traumatized. That means it negatively effected their mind. Also meditation can truly help them.

I have read about the greatest sword fighter Miyamoto Musashi. He was buddhist and he fought multiple person. He got enlightened when fighting with a person. According to him becoming very skill in sword fighting was meditation for him.

I didn't understand this. How ever it is somewhat conflicting with the five precepts of Buddhism.

stillpointdancer

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Re: Military Medical Corps
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2019, 11:37:16 AM »
I've studied a lot about PTSD when people leave military service. My father was in the second wave of the D Day landings and fought his way, after recovering from wounds, into Germany. He was a gentle person but kept to himself the trauma he continued to suffer, especially the nightmares he had of being under shellfire and rocket attacks (I learned this later from mom, who often found herself being pushed down the bed, or trench as he thought it was, in the middle of the night).

My point is that studies of mindfulness training in the US military show that people who are to be put in harms way do benefit from meditation, which should be offered to anyone about to serve in areas of conflict.

Yes. This makes sense. There are lot of military person who came back home traumatized. That means it negatively effected their mind. Also meditation can truly help them.

I have read about the greatest sword fighter Miyamoto Musashi. He was buddhist and he fought multiple person. He got enlightened when fighting with a person. According to him becoming very skill in sword fighting was meditation for him.

I didn't understand this. How ever it is somewhat conflicting with the five precepts of Buddhism.
The precepts are to protect you from doing stuff that will be painful to you later as you gain insight into the nature of things. Which is why Zen masters would allow samurai to become Buddhist pupils, because they knew that if they survived they would have to live with what they had done. Of course, the main reason was that they had so little time to live in times of war that they needed an accelerated course in Buddhism to at least be part way along the path before they died, or to have a chance, however small, of enlightenment. 
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka