Author Topic: Life is suffering?  (Read 93 times)

savethelastbreathforme

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Life is suffering?
« on: November 08, 2018, 09:57:33 PM »

Hi folks,

I have seen that the Buddha said life is suffering/impermanent. And that attachment to things, leads to suffering.

Is this true. For example when I was a lot younger, I used to dance like crazy at night clubs with my friends. I wasnt attached to dancing, I was just in the moment fully when doing it - loving every seconds of moving and feeling the music.

When the dancing and music stopped, I didnt feel bad that it had ended. The experience was enough in itself. Perhaps I would of been a little sad if I couldnt dance again, but I have no sadness now im older and no desire to dance.

We know some things are impermanent, but we dont suffer because they end. So it doesnt seem to fit with the statement which is commonly spoken.

I am new to all this, so please forgive my ignorance. If it means life in totallity is suffering, I could probably see that. Some people have a great life with good health, and they are thankful for it. And when death comes, they have no regrets.

Thanks.

Goofaholix

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Re: Life is suffering?
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2018, 06:40:31 AM »
To be more correct he said there is suffering in life, not that life is by definition suffering.  A better translation for dukkha is probably unsatisfactoriness.

You might have had a good attitude to dancing but if you look closely you'll see a constant craving for something else besides what you're currently experiencing, or wanting to get rid of what you're experiencing, we all get pushed or pulled by this to varying degrees throughout our lives.  Not to mention the major traumas that some of us have to face at times.

Laurent

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Re: Life is suffering?
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2018, 09:53:19 AM »
It can be difficult to understand the words of Buddha when one believes that there is nothing after death.
The truth is we don't really know.
Buddha said there is something after death, this means there is a new birth.
He said that Devas (heavenly beings) are also subject to death, so they are subject to birth.
Then, a Deva may be born in inferior states where suffering is the main experience, because of their actions in previous lives.

More, you don't know what will happen in the future.
So, even when one seem to have been lucky with the random birth, he doesn't know what will happen next.

Finally, even when one seem to have been lucky with the random birth, he could note that this is not the same for all.
There is objectively a lot of suffering in the world when you watch around.



"Now this, monks, is the noble truth of stress:[1] Birth is stressful, aging is stressful, death is stressful; sorrow, lamentation, pain, distress, & despair are stressful; association with the unbeloved is stressful, separation from the loved is stressful, not getting what is wanted is stressful. In short, the five clinging-aggregates are stressful."
in Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta


« Last Edit: November 09, 2018, 09:56:58 AM by Laurent »

stillpointdancer

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Re: Life is suffering?
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2018, 12:28:43 PM »

Hi folks,

I have seen that the Buddha said life is suffering/impermanent. And that attachment to things, leads to suffering.

Is this true. For example when I was a lot younger, I used to dance like crazy at night clubs with my friends. I wasnt attached to dancing, I was just in the moment fully when doing it - loving every seconds of moving and feeling the music.

When the dancing and music stopped, I didnt feel bad that it had ended. The experience was enough in itself. Perhaps I would of been a little sad if I couldnt dance again, but I have no sadness now im older and no desire to dance.

We know some things are impermanent, but we dont suffer because they end. So it doesnt seem to fit with the statement which is commonly spoken.

I am new to all this, so please forgive my ignorance. If it means life in totallity is suffering, I could probably see that. Some people have a great life with good health, and they are thankful for it. And when death comes, they have no regrets.

Thanks.
For me, the suffering he was talking about comes from not seeing things in the right way. He then gave a path to follow which, together with the tools of meditation, gets rid of this suffering. You'll still feel pain and get ill and so forth, but you will be free from the other kind of suffering that these bring.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

savethelastbreathforme

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Re: Life is suffering?
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 06:15:55 PM »
Thank you all for your answers. I feel like the quote bruce lee has on his grave "In memory of a once fluid man, crammed and distorted by the classical mess" he was talking about martial arts, but I think it translates well into modern life.


Meditative

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Re: Life is suffering?
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2018, 02:56:41 AM »
You guys know this but I think suffering comes from resistance to life and lack of awareness. We are born into this life completely in the dark in order to experience contrast. The greater degree that we are in darkness and suffering, the more potential there is for consciousness, expansion, growth, and freedom as long as we release resistance to our shadows and become more conscious of them.