Author Topic: Buddhism / nature  (Read 297 times)

lexandrius

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Buddhism / nature
« on: October 31, 2018, 03:27:52 PM »

Hi all,

A question that I was wondering about.

I was just out and about, witnessing nature.
The beautiful autumn sun shining through the (local) forest trees, the ray's of sunshine hitting on my -somewhat cold- face.
All different kind of plants, in different colors, sprouting or preparing for winter.

So this got me thinking. To a Buddhist the inner world, the spiritual practice is key.
For a practitioner of Buddhism -I think- it does not matter where this takes place.
Sitting for years in a wooden hut, cemented basement, on the bedding of a river,... would not matter.
This feels as a very disconnected view towards the world.

To me, the nature in the world (Dharma) is very important.
We ourselves may have been evolved from the smallest particles of the earth. This makes me feel connected to the whole biodiversity (plants, trees, soil, sea, mountains, insects, animals,...).
If one did not witness this, would this not be like denying parts Dharma?

I know that not all who meditate (here) are Buddhist, but hope some may shed some light on this topic,

Metta

L.

VipassanaXYZ

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2018, 06:48:21 AM »

We ourselves may have been evolved from the smallest particles of the earth. This makes me feel connected to the whole biodiversity (plants, trees, soil, sea, mountains, insects, animals,...).



The meditation gives you tools. As the ego sheds and head is more clear, nature feels closer :) This real basis of interconnection helps develop pure compassion. This feeling of connection with nature, with life, with water, with soil, will be deeper and more profound.
More effortless. Stay with the meditation and keep working.


stillpointdancer

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2018, 11:13:28 AM »
There are places where meditation is easier in terms of connecting with everything, and places where it is more difficult. However, the process is ultimately the same wherever you are. You sit in meditation and, if you close or half close your eyes, once you are 'into' the meditation it really doesn't matter where you are for the meditation to be effective.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

dharma bum

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2018, 02:39:48 PM »
for me also, being with 'nature' makes it easier to be in tune with the cycles of birth and death and with change and impermanence. human society especially in the west can feel like a bubble.
Mostly ignorant

Goofaholix

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2018, 06:40:30 PM »
Sitting for years in a wooden hut, cemented basement, on the bedding of a river,... would not matter.
This feels as a very disconnected view towards the world.

Very few people sit for years in a wooden hut or cemented basement, unless they are a prisoner.

Those that do undergo solitary practice usually do so in places where they can get closer to nature.  The Buddha recommended practicing in the forest for a reason as it opens one up more, either way though there is a whole lot off nature going on in the mind or body that remains unnoticed if we are always focusing outside and too busy or distracted to reflect on whats going on inside.

Nicky

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2018, 09:38:32 AM »
I was just out and about, witnessing nature. The beautiful...

Buddhism is about observing nature but not the "beauty" of nature but the non-beauty, defilement & meaningless of nature. Your post is essentially unrelated to Buddhism. It appears, in fact, to be Creationism.

lexandrius

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Re: Buddhism / nature
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2018, 11:48:54 AM »
As goofaholix says:
The Buddha recommended practicing in the forest for a reason as it opens one up more ... if we are always focusing outside and too busy or distracted to reflect on whats going on inside.

... in combination with VipassanaXYZ:
The meditation gives you tools. As the ego sheds and head is more clear, nature feels closer :) This real basis of interconnection helps develop pure compassion. This feeling of connection with nature, with life, with water, with soil, will be deeper and more profound.
More effortless. Stay with the meditation and keep working.

...gave me some insights.

(Sitting in) Meditation is just part of a tool to look inwards, afterwards this should not "stop", but be extended in daily life, to see impermanence wherever you are.

Nature feels easier to connect to, to see impermanence and oneness with things, flowers sprouting in spring, blossoming in summer and dying in winter, just to restart the whole process again the next year.
I do get that you can see that in city's too, people leaving for work, returning and starting all over again the next day,... However I do find this more difficult.

I hope in continuing this way I will develop some right view and have deeper connections.
Correct me if I'm wrong or missing something here :) 

... observing nature but not the "beauty" ... Your post is essentially unrelated to Buddhism. It appears, in fact, to be Creationism.

Why would it be Creationism? That would imply a divine creation in some way, the beauty of nature can arise from a scientific point of view (or any point of view for that matter).
But to clarify, I'm not a Buddhist, but rather fascinated by the practices. To better understand and deepen my knowledge, I've asked these questions.




« Last Edit: November 03, 2018, 12:23:03 PM by lexandrius »