Author Topic: longer(1hour+) sits  (Read 416 times)

Suited4Battle

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longer(1hour+) sits
« on: February 05, 2018, 10:44:53 PM »
hello,
my practice over the last few years has been 1 hr in "early" part of the day n 20 min at night.
About 2 years go I decided to go for 1 hour 15 min sits and did 3 days in a row n then felt very weird and strange with swirling energy, completely exhausted at times. I'm not sure if this was coincidental

sometimes 1 hour seemed very hard and with the additional problems I had when going to 75 min, I felt like 1 hour was my max.

I recently added 10 min and started doing 70 min sits,,,surprisingly the first time felt easier than doing 60 min, which made me realize that I had this self imposed restriction that wasn't real and this made me think what other circumstances in my life are like this?

anyway, after only increasing 10 min  I'm feeling "deeper affects" of meditation. seems strange to notice such a diff from only 10 min(which makes me wonder if the affects might be exponential after a certain point -- i can only imagine how a 2 hour sit would feel)

are there many benefits from doing long sessions?,,i feel that if i meditated for 1 hour 2X a day, the results would be much less than practicing 1 hour 30 min one sit and 30 min for the other sit,

any advice on longer sits? the main problem is at about an hour my leg can become quite painful but this was the case when i went to 45 min and an hour and thats no longer the case so maybe just sit with the pain? i practice yoga n use a cushion so i think i can experiience a lot of pain without having to stop or risk any injury



Siddharth

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2018, 05:11:30 AM »
Being a practitioner of goenka taught vipassana for more than a year and now experimenting with samatha for some time, one thing i can say that our mind is very prone to "ritualising" everything. The whole game of mind is to go into "zombie mode" where it goes on autopilot i.e. we don't need to actively be mindful of what we are doing and can delve into thought trains that the mind so promptly presents us with (This was the main reason I stopped full body scans for a while as it had gone to a point where i realised i was imagining sensations rather than observing actual ones).

Perhaps the same is true for you and your mind has adapted it's internal clock to one hour sittings and follows some fixed rhythms  in your one hour sittings without you realising. so when the duration of sitting changes, it encounters something different and is not equipped with set pattern to follow, thus you might be experiencing "deeper effects".

In my limited experience, what you are talking about is more psychological. Thus anything (including changing the duration of sitting from time to time) which keeps your mind from settling and ritualising your practise and keeps it on its toes so to say might help in your meditation.

As far as pain in leg is concerned, I do not have much experience in dealing with this. Perhaps other members can chip in.
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Nicky

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2018, 09:56:40 AM »
A meditator able to practise ananapasati (awareness of each in breath & each out breath, without disruption & lapse) generally requires 75 minutes to reach the 'rapture' phase (stage 5).

stillpointdancer

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2018, 01:15:22 PM »
Even when I was younger and fitter, 40 mins was my max length before my body started to complain. I think you need to be mindful of your body, and to respond to any problems it throws up. If I want a longer 'sit' I go for two 40 minute sits, separated by ten minutes of walking around, going to the bathroom, having a sip of water, and so on. As long as you don't chat to anyone, or go on your computer, you should get back into the meditation within a few minutes and get the benefit of one long meditation.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Suited4Battle

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2018, 09:42:47 PM »
thanks for the replies, never occurred to me that the different effects can be from the change in my meditation time not nec bec I increased it by 10min,

it's inconceivable to me that anyone could focus on just the breath without any distractions for 75 min, I'm pretty sure I never did more than 2-3 min but I guess theres a lot of other factors, I think to do that u would have to be living a monastic life and have so many other areas of your life different than an average human, cool just to think about

stillpointdancer

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2018, 01:15:23 PM »

it's inconceivable to me that anyone could focus on just the breath without any distractions for 75 min, I'm pretty sure I never did more than 2-3 min but I guess theres a lot of other factors, I think to do that u would have to be living a monastic life and have so many other areas of your life different than an average human, cool just to think about
The focus on the breath is to bring the mind back to the meditation when it does get distracted. Distractions are the norm in meditation, it's rare for it not to happen and doesn't really mean anything when it does. A mindfulness of breathing meditation has different stages, and is more of a journey than merely sitting with the breath.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Suited4Battle

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2018, 04:13:22 AM »

it's inconceivable to me that anyone could focus on just the breath without any distractions for 75 min, I'm pretty sure I never did more than 2-3 min but I guess theres a lot of other factors, I think to do that u would have to be living a monastic life and have so many other areas of your life different than an average human, cool just to think about
The focus on the breath is to bring the mind back to the meditation when it does get distracted. Distractions are the norm in meditation, it's rare for it not to happen and doesn't really mean anything when it does. A mindfulness of breathing meditation has different stages, and is more of a journey than merely sitting with the breath.

I was referring to when nicky said it takes 75 min of focus on breath without disruption or lapse to reach rapture. So can u still have thoughts while watching the breath continually? I might have misunderstood bec I took "without disruption" to mean without thoughts and "lapse" to eman not missing any breaths

stillpointdancer

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Re: longer(1hour+) sits
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2018, 12:00:46 PM »
I see what you mean. The breathing is to bring the mind back to something you want it to concentrate on, rather than it following distractions. After a while, maybe twenty minutes of this, the mind seems to settle into whatever meditation you are doing. Whether anything actually happens, such as rapture, is a different matter entirely. There is no guarantee that any meditation will lead to anything, not even after many years of practice.

Where things have happened to me during meditations, they seem to happen after I have 'got into the groove' of the meditation, usually after the first twenty minutes, but then any time after that. If you are trying to build up to something in your meditations, rather than taking it on trust that something will happen sometime, then, in my experience, it is in the repetition, day after day, rather than the length of a particular meditation. Ten minutes a day for a week is better for me than one 70 minute session.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka