Author Topic: Applying meditation to stressful situations  (Read 415 times)

Nicky

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    • Pali
Re: Applying meditation to stressful situations
« Reply #25 on: January 29, 2018, 07:47:04 PM »
Quote from: Marshmallow link=topic=3335.msg33972#msg33972

Which is more like a scientific evaluation of Buddhism...

While religious components were added to Buddhism is later centuries after the Buddha, the recorded teachings of the Buddha do not necessarily need to be understood in a religious manner. The Buddha himself described his teachings as "visible in the here & now, immediately effective, inviting inspection, to be verified by the insightful person for themselves".

The following books many help non-religious people understand Buddhism better:

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books5/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_Two_Kinds_of_Language.htm

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books5/Buddhadassa_Bhikkhu_Buddha_Dhamma_for_University_Students.pdf

http://www.suanmokkh.org/system/books/files/000/000/089/original/Kamma_in_buddhism_Buddhadasa_bhikkhu.pdf?1485253529

http://www.dhammatalks.net/Articles/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_NIBBANA_FOR_EVERYONE.htm

The problem with 'Secular Buddhism' is this new school ignores or misunderstands many important aspects of Buddhism.

 :)

Alex

  • Member
Re: Applying meditation to stressful situations
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2018, 01:43:25 PM »
So in answer to your questions Alex. 
How am I relating to this present moment experience?  I feel like I am telling myself all the right things that I should be doing and trying to do them, (Sit with the anxiety, don't fight it, allow it to be as it is etc.)  but the situation remained unchanged (ruminating, anxiety etc.)

What do you expect meditation to do for you?  Be able to recognize negative thought patters, allow myself to be in my situation as it is without fighting against it and be able to stay in the present and not get caught up in my thought patterns.  And ultimately by doing these things, feel more in control of my mind and my emotions.

So, trying to do meditation the right way in order to change your feelings/thoughts doesn't work?

Interesting ;)

So maybe it’s more about letting go of control instead of finding the right thing to do?

Deeply understanding anxiety and consequently finding yourself in a different relation to anxiety makes a world of difference. But I wouldn’t call that control, not even indirect control. Skilful action doesn't come from a need to control.

Alex

  • Member
Re: Applying meditation to stressful situations
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2018, 01:48:42 PM »
As I suggested to you, meditation cannot help the above situation (unless you are willing to psychologically detach from your family) because family relationships are moral matters rather than meditation matters. Family relationships are ideally conducted in a certain way & you should be able to clearly discern any deviation from proper behavior in family relationships as both wrong & something that must be addressed. Given families are both important & entail responsibilities,  problems in families give rise to anxiety. The Buddhist way is to attempt the fix the family problems rather than simply keep calm in meditation. This is why you need to learn more knowledge & wisdom about how relationships ideally should be conducted.

Buddhism teaches us what is wrong, namely, lying, harsh speech, violence, anger, hatred, ungratitude, non-lovingness, etc. Wrong things lead to suffering & conflict. As Buddhists, we can learn to "look down upon" what is wrong, which will lift up our mind.

These insights, this wisdom is not exclusively Buddhist, it’s universal, “nature”. That’s why he called it dhamma and not ‘Buddhism’ or some other distinctive term. Other sources of wisdom may be very valuable and one can evaluate for oneself, as you quoted... "visible in the here & now, immediately effective, inviting inspection, to be verified by the insightful person for themselves".

“Look down upon”… I don’t know… maybe I’m adding meaning to your words, but this choice of words feels judgmental. My experience is that when I have judgment in my heart, it shows in my words or actions. Which doesn’t mean I can’t be clear of what is inappropriate or unacceptable…

Alex

  • Member
Re: Applying meditation to stressful situations
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2018, 01:50:05 PM »
The problem with 'Secular Buddhism' is this new school ignores or misunderstands many important aspects of Buddhism.

Secular Buddhism is a mental construct referring to a very heterogeneous collection of people and organizations trying to do something with the dharma that is relevant in our in a modern day context. There is off course ignorance and misunderstanding... I mean: I just have to look at myself  :D but Buddhism’s voyage to the west is far from over and there are plenty of voices advocating for deeper understanding before throwing things out.