Author Topic: states and traits  (Read 233 times)

pwinston

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states and traits
« on: January 26, 2018, 01:11:20 PM »
A quote I like from Sam Harris podcast #111 "the science of meditation" around 26 minute mark.

This is Richard (Richie) Davidson:

"Altered states refer to the experiences we have sitting on the cushion or sitting on a chair when we're meditating and the importance of mediation lies not really in the transitory experiences we have when we are meditating, but it is in the impact of these practices in every nook and cranny of our everyday life. And this is what we refer to as altered traits. Altered traits are enduring changes that are consequences of our practice that impact every aspect of our lives, ..."
 

Matthew

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Re: states and traits
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2018, 12:25:30 PM »
This is another take on something I've often written here: meditation practice is called practice because it allows us to cultivate calm, concentration, compassion etc in a heightened form. It's "practice" though: what really matters is how you bring these things into your everyday life and dealings with people and situations.
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Siddharth

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    • unlearning, relearning and letting go
Re: states and traits
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2018, 01:34:32 PM »
This is something I have realised quite recently (no wonder i have been very consistent with my practice in the recent times !).

Once we are able to see our practise really as "practise", we become less concerned about "doing it right" from the first time itself or getting too concerned with other people's experiences and trying to get "certain sensations". Like a beginner in the gym does different routines, and his routine evolves with his own level and experience; our practise too evolves depending on where we are and there is no one "right way".

This was very liberating for me, who is very concerned about doing things perfectly and forfeiting/getting discouraged by even small deviations from "perfection". Me being able to understand about myself without any external feedback and slowly but surely changing my behaviour pattern and the way I react to stimuli, is truly a fruit of meditation. Or as you said : Altered trait.

There are other things(habit patterns which i have been carrying since childhood) that I have realised about myself and working on them might change 90% of my reactions or decisions that I take passively. But step by step. calmly. that has been the key learning for me.

Thanks for the post. Felt better after sharing
 
And what is good, Phædrus,
And what is not good...
Need we ask anyone to tell us these things?