Author Topic: Can non-Vipassana-meditators differentiate between delusion and reality?  (Read 253 times)

Lemora

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I think I already know the answer, but I have met people who have so much wisdom, are aware of this path and that path (with this one particular fellow - the fourth way) yet are still miserable. I am reminded of the wisdom/devotion metaphor (is that what it's called?), where Goenka talks about the eyes (being wisdom) seeing the path, and the feet (being devotion) walking on the path, and how (if I remember correctly) that it is only in the ego & intellectual entertainment (can anyone find me this segment where he talks about this?) that is a DELUSION (attachment/identification with pleasant sensation) of walking on the path because "I am so intelligent/enlightened because I read this or that book" - And then an unpleasant sensation throws them into the same cycle non-Vipassana meditators are in.

I also think about how practicing Vipassana at a Center, where they do not have a chance to escape or be distracted by the outer world... Is there really is any other practice that you can achieve the same results where you can practice on your own in the normal world?
« Last Edit: January 23, 2018, 05:38:31 AM by Lemora »

stillpointdancer

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Yes, I think that it is an inherent human quality. Perhaps along the lines of the Kafka quote “You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.”

But this is not enough, of course, in that we exist in contexts which define reality for us. Our understanding after such an experience is hijacked by the culture we find ourselves inhabiting, so it is not easy to continue experiencing such differentiation. Which is where Vipassana comes in, providing both a context both in the lead up to such an event, and to provide help with living in the aftermath of that instance of seeing through delusion.


“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka