Author Topic: Neuroscience and Buddha practice  (Read 689 times)

TheJourney

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Neuroscience and Buddha practice
« on: April 07, 2017, 02:17:35 AM »
It is established science in Neuroscience that focused or concentration meditation leads to theta brain wave which is where hypnosis leads to as well. Concentration meditation and hypnosis are both dominant in theta wave frequency.

Dr Benson, Harvard Medical doctor, wrote a book about relaxed breathing meditation. Re-read Anapanasati Sutta. Buddha taught relaxed mindful breathing - relaxed body and relaxed mind yet mind is fully alert and aware. Concentration is anything but relaxing. The sutta never said to count, to think of mantra, notice abdomen going up and down, or notice air that strikes the nostril area. All of these are concentration meditation.

Venerable Bhante Vimalarami studied sutta and noticed that Buddha emphasized metta more often. Metta meditation based on reciting metta is also not very inductive. Venerable Vimalaramsi teaches directly out of sutta. Google him and learn tranquil wisdom insight meditation.

Fill your heart with joy and put on a slight smile which pervades joy in you and relaxes you. Apply the 6 Rs to deal with distractions. Get the details from him at dhammasukha.org

I have tried Goenka, Mahasi, Pamojjo (mindful knowing), Dr Punnaji, and Ven. Vimalaramsi's approach. The last two are based strictly on sutta's instructions; however, the last one is more superior in its efficacy. Ven. Vimalaramsi found out that Buddha placed more emphasis on metta practice than on breathing because there were more sutta on the former.

As Buddha said, you have to try it to know it directly which method is most suitable for you and is also efficient in terms of progress. For me, the last two are just phenomenal. You have to try it to know it. Dr Punnaji's primary focus is bringing unconscious emotional reaction into the consciousness.

Neuroscience says metta meditation is like building super highway from prefrontal cortex to the amygdala. Currently, it is just a wooded trail while amygdala has super highway speed to your prefrontal cortex. This is why emotion generally wins the conflict over reality.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 02:20:44 AM by TheJourney »

Vishal

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Re: Neuroscience and Buddha practice
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2017, 07:44:22 AM »

I have tried Goenka, Mahasi, Pamojjo (mindful knowing), Dr Punnaji, and Ven. Vimalaramsi's approach. The last two are based strictly on sutta's instructions; however, the last one is more superior in its efficacy. Ven. Vimalaramsi found out that Buddha placed more emphasis on metta practice than on breathing because there were more sutta on the former.


Good on you!

If you have found a technique to be more effective for yourself and which works for you then the best suggestion of old masters is to continue with it before your mind tricks you into running after more superior and effective techniques. "The jack of all tries everything and becomes master of none" situation will not help no meditator and will end up wasting their precious human life.

Suttas are guidelines and are just for our guidance on the path and are non binding. Buddha never emphasized on one part of the path. His every word is complete in it self and is dhamma for the right student. Remember Moglana who heard just two lines of Dhamma from the old monk and became stream winner and Sariputa heard only half of that line and became stream winner right there.

This technique is superior and that technique is inferior is all subjective & ignorant opinions. The technique should be made up of 8 fold Noble path with the end results of Nirvana. Once you find it, stick to it. 

With Metta

Vishal

stillpointdancer

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Re: Neuroscience and Buddha practice
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2017, 10:51:46 AM »
I think that our minds go through different stages, and need different meditations at different times. The trick is to know which to use at any given point. I would say that trying different types to see what works at the time is better than trying just one type for a while, thinking 'meditation isn't for me', and then giving up altogether. Unfortunately, most teachers are so involved in their own particular programme that they try to force it on people not ready for it yet.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka