Author Topic: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana  (Read 5478 times)

playground

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Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« on: November 05, 2016, 12:10:27 AM »

I've been reading the material available on www.Dhamma.org.
Regarding Vipassana the site says this:

Quote
Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gotama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills...

I'm interested in this _rediscovery_ idea.
Because clearly, it means vipassana was there, pre-existing, 
presumably within a Hindu tradition,.. and was later discovered anew by Buddha.

I'm interested in the earliest origins of Vipassana.
Does anyone know which Hindu tradition or which Hindu scripture speaks about
vipassana prior to Buddha's life ? 

If you don't know the answer, do you know who i might ask ?
Or where i might pursue an answer ?

thanks for your help :)

Nicky

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2016, 03:23:12 AM »
Hinduism came into existence after Buddhism. Before Buddhism, the predominant religion of the priestly caste was called Brahmanism. There actually is no evidence in both the Brahman Vedas and original Pali scriptures that the Brahmans practised vipassana (i.e., insight meditation into the reality of not-self/anatta).

A person cannot be a Buddhist & believe Hindus discovered anatta-vipassana because the very definition of a Buddha is the person that discovers the enlightenment that ends all dukkha (suffering).

Hindus believe in the Atman while Buddha taught anatta (not-atman) thus it is impossible a Hindu can practise vipassana since vipassana means clearly seeing anatta.

Regards  :)

Nicky

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2016, 03:28:44 AM »
In the Pali suttas, there is the Nagara Sutta: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn12/sn12.065.than.html

While I personally do not believe what is written in it, the Nagara Sutta seems to state Gotama Buddha rediscovered the path of previous Buddhas (rather than rediscovered a Brahman or Hindu path). Thus, the Buddha rediscovered Buddhism rather than rediscovered Hinduism.

Quote
In the same way I saw an ancient path, an ancient road, traveled by the Rightly Self-awakened Ones of former times. And what is that ancient path, that ancient road, traveled by the Rightly Self-awakened Ones of former times? Just this noble eightfold path: right view, right aspiration, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, right concentration. That is the ancient path, the ancient road, traveled by the Rightly Self-awakened Ones of former times.

 :)


playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2016, 09:00:31 AM »
thank you Nicky :)

Quardamon

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2016, 11:01:19 AM »
The view that vipassana meditation is central to Buddhism is about a hundred years old. Erik Braun wrote a book on that, called "The Birth of Insight - meditation, modern Buddhism and the Burmese monk Ledi Sayadaw". Or, if you prefer, there is a series of 20 minute interviews with him on Youtube, starting here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V97ET2M5L98

Nicky

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2016, 12:02:23 PM »
'Vipassana' is a term found in the Pali suttas. It is 2,600 years old.

Laurent

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2016, 12:59:51 PM »
Personnaly, i don't care if the word "vipassana" did exist or not before one century.
Vipassana means see as it is, or see deeply.
It is easy to understand that when you observe something, you will begin to see it more clearly, less superficially.
It is a normal, universal process.
Goenka said it has been re-discovered because Buddha told that perfect awakening is a process that happens sometimes in this world and then has already happened and will happen in the future.
Even if we don't believe in this: it makes sense, Buddha says he did not invent anything, he discovered something, see something true, as it is.


« Last Edit: November 05, 2016, 01:08:07 PM by Laurent »

stillpointdancer

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2016, 02:03:51 PM »
I think vipassana is part of being human. Whenever we stop and give our brains space to think in the right way, that is vipassana. Shamanism was probably the earliest form, before it was hijacked by those wanting to control growing societies. The genius of the Buddha was in understanding this inherent ability, practicing it for himself, and then refining it for others to use. The lineage of vipassana practice before Buddhism is interesting, but can never detract from the Buddha's teaching.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Matthew

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #8 on: November 07, 2016, 07:34:04 AM »
The view that vipassana meditation is central to Buddhism is about a hundred years old ...

'Vipassana' is a term found in the Pali suttas. It is 2,600 years old.

You are both correct. The invention of Vipassana techniques as a path is a modern invention from Burmese teachers. Vipassana does appear the Suttas, as a product, fruit or "phala" of right meditation. It appears less than Jhana in terms of reference to meditation by a long way.
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Matthew

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2016, 07:42:15 AM »
Quote
Vipassana, which means to see things as they really are, is one of India's most ancient techniques of meditation. It was rediscovered by Gotama Buddha more than 2500 years ago and was taught by him as a universal remedy for universal ills...

This is not right view.

Quote
I'm interested in this _rediscovery_ idea.
Because clearly, it means vipassana was there, pre-existing, 
presumably within a Hindu tradition,.. and was later discovered anew by Buddha.

I'm interested in the earliest origins of Vipassana.
Does anyone know which Hindu tradition or which Hindu scripture speaks about
vipassana prior to Buddha's life ?  ..

As Nicky says, the rediscovery was of the whole path. The term Vipassana as a form of meditation dates back less than two hundred years from an attempt by Burmese teachers to develop  meditative path that is less difficult for laypersons, particularly not including mastery of the Jhanas, something which is clear from the original texts is a prerequisite Vipassana arising.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2016, 11:10:51 PM »
The view that vipassana meditation is central to Buddhism is about a hundred years old. Erik Braun wrote a book on that, called "The Birth of Insight - meditation, modern Buddhism and the Burmese monk Ledi Sayadaw". Or, if you prefer, there is a series of 20 minute interviews with him on Youtube, starting here:

Thanks for this video Quardamon...
It's really interesting.
Where did you find it ?
And is there a transcript ?...  i didn't quite catch some of  those names.
Are there more videos like this, where you found it ?

Thanks for your help... be happy :-)
« Last Edit: November 11, 2016, 05:25:39 PM by Matthew »

dharma bum

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2016, 03:22:19 AM »
Many of the Buddha's ideas existed in India during and before his time. Mahavira for example was a contemporary of Buddha and his life has many similarities. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahavira There is a great deal of overlap between Indian religions.

It seems reasonable that there would be other monks who attained something close to Buddhist enlightenment before and after the Buddha. It is improbable that the Buddha invented everything from scratch. Whether the modern technique itself was known or not is hard to say, but it seems to me that if you sit in meditation long enough (months, years), you are bound to notice that observing your sensations calms the body and mind.
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Quardamon

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Where to find the interview with Erik Braun
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2016, 06:29:35 AM »
I saw the videos as part of a Coursera course "Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World: Lesser Vehicle". One can inscribe to that course for free, and look through the curriculum and pick the videos that one likes. There is little of no connection between what one teacher does and what another teacher does. So, you can inscribe just to see the Erik Braun interviews in week 5. There, you can download a txt file with the text.

The interviews with Erik Braun can be found at the Youtube channel: Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World, here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq9wyzKWuKIFVkQxWO-02CQ

You will have to scroll down, beyond something about yoga with pretty ladies. There is also a series of videos of an interview with David Mick about jhanas, in a very practical tone. He mentions how to shift form one jhana to the next. (That does not help me, but it is refreshing that someone talks about it in a matter-of-fact tone.)

playground

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Re: Where to find the interview with Erik Braun
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2016, 09:17:50 AM »
I saw the videos as part of a Coursera course "Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World: Lesser Vehicle". One can inscribe to that course for free, and look through the curriculum and pick the videos that one likes. There is little of no connection between what one teacher does and what another teacher does. So, you can inscribe just to see the Erik Braun interviews in week 5. There, you can download a txt file with the text.

The interviews with Erik Braun can be found at the Youtube channel: Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World, here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq9wyzKWuKIFVkQxWO-02CQ

You will have to scroll down, beyond something about yoga with pretty ladies. There is also a series of videos of an interview with David Mick about jhanas, in a very practical tone. He mentions how to shift form one jhana to the next. (That does not help me, but it is refreshing that someone talks about it in a matter-of-fact tone.)

Thanks Quardamon,  you're a star !

I've just signed up for two courses:

1.  Buddhism and Modern Psychology

2.  Tibetan Buddhist Meditation and the Modern World: Lesser Vehicle

Both courses are free.  How nice :)

best wishes

playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2016, 08:46:44 AM »
Many of the Buddha's ideas existed in India during and before his time. Mahavira for example was a contemporary of Buddha and his life has many similarities. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahavira There is a great deal of overlap between Indian religions.

It seems reasonable that there would be other monks who attained something close to Buddhist enlightenment before and after the Buddha. It is improbable that the Buddha invented everything from scratch. Whether the modern technique itself was known or not is hard to say, but it seems to me that if you sit in meditation long enough (months, years), you are bound to notice that observing your sensations calms the body and mind.

Excellent... Thanks for pointing out 'Mahavira' Dhamma Bum.
He looks like the mould from which Buddha was cast.
And this makes me wonder if Buddhism, to some extent, evolved out of Jainism.

Thanks again Dhamma Bum :)


Laurent

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2016, 02:17:37 PM »
Many of the Buddha's ideas existed in India during and before his time. Mahavira for example was a contemporary of Buddha and his life has many similarities. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahavira There is a great deal of overlap between Indian religions.

It seems reasonable that there would be other monks who attained something close to Buddhist enlightenment before and after the Buddha. It is improbable that the Buddha invented everything from scratch. Whether the modern technique itself was known or not is hard to say, but it seems to me that if you sit in meditation long enough (months, years), you are bound to notice that observing your sensations calms the body and mind.

Hello,

Actually, this is the view of Buddha which is really revolutionnary. It is possible that some people reach the state of buddha without knowing the dhamma, as mentioned by the Buddha himself.
The real difference between buddhism and pre-buddhist awakening doctrines is rather on the view than on the techniques.
It is the view which allows a person to reach Nibbana in the buddhist sense of Nibbana.

playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #16 on: November 11, 2016, 02:32:36 PM »
Many of the Buddha's ideas existed in India during and before his time. Mahavira for example was a contemporary of Buddha and his life has many similarities. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahavira There is a great deal of overlap between Indian religions.

It seems reasonable that there would be other monks who attained something close to Buddhist enlightenment before and after the Buddha. It is improbable that the Buddha invented everything from scratch. Whether the modern technique itself was known or not is hard to say, but it seems to me that if you sit in meditation long enough (months, years), you are bound to notice that observing your sensations calms the body and mind.

Hello,

Actually, this is the view of Buddha which is really revolutionnary. It is possible that some people reach the state of buddha without knowing the dhamma, as mentioned by the Buddha himself.
The real difference between buddhism and pre-buddhist awakening doctrines is rather on the view than on the techniques.
It is the view which allows a person to reach Nibbana in the buddhist sense of Nibbana.

Or maybe... if you meditate sufficiently and consistently...
you'll reach Nibbana... irrespective of what you believe.

Maybe Adolph Hilter... or even... 'Kilary' Clinton .... could do manage with sufficient practice.

I'm now wondering if there are Luciferian forms of meditation.

Laurent

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #17 on: November 11, 2016, 02:46:58 PM »
Many of the Buddha's ideas existed in India during and before his time. Mahavira for example was a contemporary of Buddha and his life has many similarities. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahavira There is a great deal of overlap between Indian religions.

It seems reasonable that there would be other monks who attained something close to Buddhist enlightenment before and after the Buddha. It is improbable that the Buddha invented everything from scratch. Whether the modern technique itself was known or not is hard to say, but it seems to me that if you sit in meditation long enough (months, years), you are bound to notice that observing your sensations calms the body and mind.

Hello,

Actually, this is the view of Buddha which is really revolutionnary. It is possible that some people reach the state of buddha without knowing the dhamma, as mentioned by the Buddha himself.
The real difference between buddhism and pre-buddhist awakening doctrines is rather on the view than on the techniques.
It is the view which allows a person to reach Nibbana in the buddhist sense of Nibbana.

Or maybe... if you meditate sufficiently and consistently...
you'll reach Nibbana... irrespective of what you believe.

Maybe Adolph Hilter... or even... 'Kilary' Clinton .... could do manage with sufficient practice.

I'm now wondering if there are Luciferian forms of meditation.

Hello Playground,

It is very clear in the Suttas that the view is the ultimate thing that allows a person to release everything, renouce to everything, and reach Nibbana. Right view is reached by meditation though, not intellectual vision. I will try to find back an extract which clearly shows that.

EDIT:
"There remains only equanimity: pure & bright, pliant, malleable, & luminous. Just as if a skilled goldsmith or goldsmith's apprentice were to prepare a furnace, heat up a crucible, and, taking gold with a pair of tongs, place it in the crucible: He would blow on it time & again, sprinkle water on it time & again, examine it time & again, so that the gold would become refined, well-refined, thoroughly refined, flawless, free from dross, pliant, malleable, & luminous. Then whatever sort of ornament he had in mind — whether a belt, an earring, a necklace, or a gold chain — it would serve his purpose. In the same way, there remains only equanimity: pure & bright, pliant, malleable, & luminous. One discerns that 'If I were to direct equanimity as pure & bright as this toward the dimension of the infinitude of space, I would develop the mind along those lines, and thus this equanimity of mine — thus supported, thus sustained — would last for a long time. One discerns that 'If I were to direct equanimity as pure and bright as this toward the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness... the dimension of nothingness... the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, I would develop the mind along those lines, and thus this equanimity of mine — thus supported, thus sustained — would last for a long time.'

"One discerns that 'If I were to direct equanimity as pure & bright as this towards the dimension of the infinitude of space and to develop the mind along those lines, that would be fabricated. One discerns that 'If I were to direct equanimity as pure and bright as this towards the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness... the dimension of nothingness... the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception and to develop the mind along those lines, that would be fabricated.' One neither fabricates nor mentally fashions for the sake of becoming or un-becoming. This being the case, one is not sustained by anything in the world (does not cling to anything in the world). Unsustained, one is not agitated. Unagitated, one is totally unbound right within. One discerns that 'Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for this world." (in Dhatuvibhanga Sutta)

Luciferian forms of meditation would mean materialist, mundane oriented meditations, i guess. It probably exists.

« Last Edit: November 11, 2016, 03:13:04 PM by Laurent »

dharma bum

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #18 on: November 11, 2016, 03:49:04 PM »
It is delightful to come across a bunch of folks interested in the same things as me.

I came across some Catholics in India who do Vipassana, their retreat led by a Jesuit priest.
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Matthew

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #19 on: November 11, 2016, 05:28:40 PM »

Or maybe... if you meditate sufficiently and consistently...
you'll reach Nibbana... irrespective of what you believe.

Right view is essential to the path - it is one of the eight folds and all need to be taken in hand. Belief is not useful. Beliefs tend to die away as you practice and stop clinging to view.

Maybe Adolph Hilter... or even... 'Kilary' Clinton .... could do manage with sufficient practice.

I'm now wondering if there are Luciferian forms of meditation.

Meditation can be used to harness the power of mind to evil ends. There is no doubt of this. It is why there are folds of the path concerned with morality that also must be followed.
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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #20 on: November 11, 2016, 05:31:44 PM »
It is delightful to come across a bunch of folks interested in the same things as me.

I came across some Catholics in India who do Vipassana, their retreat led by a Jesuit priest.

I knew some catholic nuns in Southend, England who were part of an order called "The Sisters of Mercy" .. yet they were renegades ...

- They were anti-Papist

- They had Buddha and Christ side by side on their alter

- They defined a church as "any group who practice meditation together"

- They saw "God" in everything and manifesting as everything

Of course, their order was not delighted with their views so they farmed them out to run a little retreat centre :D
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dharma bum

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #21 on: November 11, 2016, 10:17:38 PM »
Quote
And this makes me wonder if Buddhism, to some extent, evolved out of Jainism.

Thanks again Dhamma Bum :)<

Playground, Jainism is said to be much older than Buddhism and Hinduism, though I suppose it can be said with justification that Hinduism has never been very well-defined. My own perspective is that Buddhism evolved out of the Buddha's investigation into the nature of suffering. Everything started from there. He used ideas that served the purpose, perhaps invented some new ones, and discarded the rest. Luckily, he had a very organized mind and great organizational skills, so his ideas were passed on to us.

I read a book by a Tibetan master in which he states that ideas of Buddhist meditation and the various states of mind had parallels in some techniques of Hindu meditation. I find it plausible that these techniques were commonly known at that time.

http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Buddhism_and_Jainism
« Last Edit: November 11, 2016, 11:08:10 PM by dharma bum »
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playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #22 on: November 12, 2016, 02:43:41 AM »
Quote
And this makes me wonder if Buddhism, to some extent, evolved out of Jainism.

Thanks again Dhamma Bum :)<

Playground, Jainism is said to be much older than Buddhism and Hinduism, though I suppose it can be said with justification that Hinduism has never been very well-defined. My own perspective is that Buddhism evolved out of the Buddha's investigation into the nature of suffering. Everything started from there. He used ideas that served the purpose, perhaps invented some new ones, and discarded the rest. Luckily, he had a very organized mind and great organizational skills, so his ideas were passed on to us.

I read a book by a Tibetan master in which he states that ideas of Buddhist meditation and the various states of mind had parallels in some techniques of Hindu meditation. I find it plausible that these techniques were commonly known at that time.

http://www.dhammawiki.com/index.php?title=Buddhism_and_Jainism


Thanks again Dharma Bum... 
your presence on this forum is ... err... enlightening :)

The link you provide.. is extremely interesting.

The list of similarities between Mahravira and Buddha...
makes me realise... not think... that they are the same person.

No way are these identical details 'purely coincidental'

No creator god

    There is no creator god in Jainism.
    There is no creator god in Buddhism.

No creation myth

    There is no creation myth in Jainism, a first beginning is not knowable.
    There is no creation myth in Buddhism, a first beginning is not knowable.

Previous founders

    Mahavira was not the founder, but rather the re-discoverer of the truth according to Jainism.
    Buddha was not the founder, but rather the re-discoverer of the truth according to Buddhism.

24 prior teachers

    According to Jainism there are 24 known tirthankaras who discovered the truth after a time when the teachings were lost.
    According to Buddhism (Buddhavamsa) there were 24 previous Buddhas who discovered the truth (plus 3 in prehistoric times and Gotama-Buddha for a total of 28.

Warrior caste

    Mahavira was born into the ksatriya caste (warrior caste).
    Buddha was born into the ksatriya caste (warrior caste).

Siddhatha

    Mahavira was born to a ksatriyan chief named Siddhatha.
    Buddha was to a ksatriyan chief and Buddha's birth name was Siddhatha.

Yasoda

    Mahavira married a woman named Yasoda.
    Buddha married a woman named Yasoda.

One child

    Mahavira had one child (a daughter).
    Buddha had one child (a son).

Height of 6 feet

    It is reported that Mahavira was 6 feet tall (1.83m)
    It is reported that Buddha was 6 feet tall (1.83m)

Enlightenment under a tree

    Mahavira renounced the world at age 20 attained enlightenment under a tree at 28 and lived to 72 years.
    Buddha renounced the world at age 29 attained enlightenment under a tree at 35 and lived to 80 years.

Asceticism

    Mahavira practiced asceticism toward enlightenment.
    Buddha practiced asceticism toward / prior to enlightenment.

Dharma Shramana

    Jainism is in the Dharma category of religions that practice Shramana, which includes forms of renunciation and mental purification.
    Buddhism is in the Dharma category of religions that practice Shramana, which includes forms of renunciation and mental purification.

Yellow

    The color yellow is associated with Mahavira
    The color yellow is associated with Buddha (he wore yellow robes) and yellow is a common color in Buddhist temples

Rejection of caste

    Jainism rejects caste distinctions based on birth.
    Buddhism rejects caste distinctions based on birth.

5 precepts

    There are 5 great vows or precepts in Jainism.
    There are 5 primary precepts in Buddhism.

First Precept of Ahimsa

    The first precept in Jainism is Ahimsa (non-violence), which extends to all living beings.
    The first precept in Buddhism is to not kill, which extends to all living beings.

Second precept

    A second precept in Jainism is Satya (truthfulness).
    A second precept in Buddhism is truthfulness.

Third precept

    A third precept in Jainism is Asteya (not stealing).
    A third precept in Buddhism is not stealing.

Fourth precept

    A fourth precept in Jainism is Brahmacharya (celibacy for monks and nuns no sexual misconduct for lay people).
    A fourth precept in Buddhism is to refrain from sexual misconduct (celibacy for monks and nuns).

Fifth precept

    A fifth precept in Jainism in is Aparigraha non-materialism, non-attachment to material things.
    A fifth precept in Buddhism is refrain from intoxicating drinks and drugs which lead to carelessness. (The only precept of the 5 which is somewhat different, but not completely different since the Buddhist version is also calling for no attachment.)

Fourfold assembly

    Mahavira instituted a fourfold assembly of monks, nuns, lay men, and lay women.
    Buddha instituted a fourfold assembly of monks, nuns, lay men, and lay women.

Nirvana (Nibbana)

    Jainism teaches that one must undergo pure conduct, practice meditation and attain enlightenment, release from rebirth.
    Buddhism teaches that one must undergo pure conduct, practice meditation and attain enlightenment, release from rebirth.

The other shore

    In Jainism the tirthankaras are known as ford-makers, who have crossed the river of samsara and rebirth.
    In Buddhism the simile of crossing the ocean to the other shore is frequently used to describe enlightenment, nibbana.

It's too much to ask, that there were two people walking around
with these similarities and the same life-story,
...  not historically... but as contemporaries.

Sorry... it's simply too much to ask... 
that these two people are the same person.

The minimum you can say is that Jainism and Buddhism intersect at this point.
But i think it's reasonable to consider that Buddhism has evolved out of Jainism.




playground

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #23 on: November 12, 2016, 05:47:23 AM »
I'm afraid i made a typo in my post above...
the correction i would like to make is shown in bold below:


It's too much to ask, that there were two people walking around
with these similarities and the same life-story,
...  not historically... but as contemporaries.

Sorry... it's simply too much to ask... 
that these two people are NOT the same person.

The minimum you can say is that Jainism and Buddhism intersect at this point.
But i think it's reasonable to consider that Buddhism has evolved out of Jainism.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2016, 06:19:04 AM by playground »

stillpointdancer

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Re: Buddha's _rediscovery_ of vipassana
« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2016, 12:18:42 PM »
The great thing is that they don't have to be the same person. If you do the same things in meditation and life, the same consequences will arise as a condition of your actions. In the sense that the same internal changes can allow people to see things in the same way, given that they live in similar cultures.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka