Author Topic: A Most disturbing book  (Read 973 times)

joetattoo

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A Most disturbing book
« on: August 22, 2016, 10:46:08 AM »
I just finished reading "A Death On Diamond Mountain", and I was appalled by the actions of the main characters and their skewered views on enlightenment and Buddhism. What is it about us Americans that we have to do it quicker, faster and damm the consequences. I was sickened by their actions, their thought processes, and their incredible egos, that they could twist and bastardize things to suit their needs. Mostly, I feel the deepest compassion for all the thousands that followed them, believing that they were being led by almost godlike people.

Laurent

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Re: A Most disturbing book
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2016, 12:48:40 PM »
Many renowned buddhists instruct things that are in obvious contradiction with the suttas  :(

joetattoo

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Re: A Most disturbing book
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2016, 01:36:29 PM »
Yes, but why are they renowned? Is it because too many of us want the quick fix, unwilling to work, demanding instant gratification in a high speed computer world where results are expected in days, not decades, and we are willing to devote ourselves to unconventional teachers, some of whom are delusional, dangerous charlatans, for the promise of quick reward. Sorry, I'm  venting, but I fear for what the future may bring.

mdr

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Re: A Most disturbing book
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2016, 05:00:09 PM »
I just finished reading "A Death On Diamond Mountain", and I was appalled by the actions of the main characters and their skewered views on enlightenment and Buddhism. What is it about us Americans that we have to do it quicker, faster and damm the consequences. I was sickened by their actions, their thought processes, and their incredible egos, that they could twist and bastardize things to suit their needs. Mostly, I feel the deepest compassion for all the thousands that followed them, believing that they were being led by almost godlike people.

I think it's about human nature, not about Americans (i am European, don't think...)  ;)

Quote
I was sickened by their actions, their thought processes, and their incredible egos, that they could twist and bastardize things to suit their needs

I think all cool ideas throughout history got corrupted so to serve  opportunistic individual goals... For those of us who kinda believe in reincarnation/ karma/ tikkun it could make sense, that we'll go in circles until we reach some kind of completion or liberation; what are the rest supposed to believe... not sure  :(

I wasn't familiar with this very case / book so i did some reading before replying:
(from: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/us/mysterious-yoga-retreat-ends-in-a-grisly-death.html?_r=0 )
"The monk who ran the retreat, Michael Roach, had previously run a diamond business worth tens of millions of dollars and was now promoting Buddhist principles as a path to financial prosperity,"

??? ??? ???

And that's just to begin with.

I am an idealist by default (not saying it's good or bad, just the way it is), so i don't get that and i feel saddened and even more than that, like you do.

Some people are 'snake oil sellers'. They don't care about words, whatever they are saying/ twisting/ lying , as long as they are 'selling' their goods.

For your own peace of mind (and mine too), albeit it's morally wrong, the sooner we accept such things exist, the calmer we'd be.

playground

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Re: A Most disturbing book
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2016, 02:33:10 AM »


Quote:
"...Michael Roach, had previously run a diamond business worth tens of millions of dollars and was now promoting Buddhist principles as a path to financial prosperity,"

Soooo.... what happened next ?
He started killing his guests ?