Author Topic: Huge pressure into the whole head  (Read 11934 times)

Anarcho

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #50 on: January 26, 2016, 03:40:05 PM »
Anarcho

Am sorry this was not so clear.

In the east, death is looked upon as a mere fact of impermanence.
It is not something scary - nothing at all the like the presentation (sometimes scary graphics) in the West.

It might sound strange, but when someone old passes away, there is not much mourning.
On the 13th day everyone gathers and eats together.

I posted a link too that talks about the buddhist way of looking at death: as truth of everyone's life, as impermanence.
More on this here: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/walshe/wheel261.html

About the karma getting exhausted:)


There is karma of the past, and there is karma of the present moment (much more powerful).
Karma of the past will take its due course (no one can tell). To make best of the karma of the present, keeping equanimity will deplete the unskillful karma and reacting will multiply it (like adding fuel to the fire).

Basis of calm/equanimity is good skillful action of the body, speech and mind.

No, it's ok. It's just me who was imaging something else.
And it doesn't sound strange for me. I didn't receive this kind of education, but it must be something universal.
Even if equanimity in action, speech and mind are maybe not ever easy to determine... and consequently even more difficult to practice.

VipassanaXYZ

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #51 on: January 27, 2016, 07:02:42 AM »
Yes.

It is very difficult to work directly on equanimity.
One notices on the hindsight how cool the head was ...

But what can be done is to build the factors of equanimity: Shila (morality) and samadhi (focus/concentration on breath).
For more details: the 37 factors of enlightenment
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bodhipakkhiy%C4%81dhamm%C4%81

Alex

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #52 on: January 30, 2016, 11:18:16 AM »
With pleasure about Jacobson. I lay down on the couch and I listen to a voice which says me what to do. It's something like 15 minutes. You just have to contract all the muscles part by part, and watch the relaxation in the member just after. It's easy and can fastly calm down the tensions in the body and the mind in the same time.
You can find such sound for free on the internet ( http://www.changingmindsenterprisecic.co.uk/v/relaxation_audio ).

I'm glad this method works well for you! I listened to the recording and found it very relaxing as well. Maybe it's informative to take a  closer look at the recording, if that is the one you use: it starts with abdominal breathing. Then there is some mindfulness of breathing. Then a quick bodyscan. Finally there is Jacobson: progressive relaxation by contracting and relaxing muscle groups starting at the feet and moving your way up.

I have a lot of things I want to say, after rereading your posts, but we all know this path is a practice, something to be put into practice. A practice that is not about getting anywhere, but about unlearning all these habitual patterns of relating to things. Unlearning these tendencies to control or 'push' (as you called it) for example. That’s why I want to propose to you a “new” experiment:

  • Start all over again. Adopt a beginner’s mind. Forget what you have learned (or think you have learned) so far. Really, start fresh. Do this every time you do your practice.
  • Start your practice with Jacobson method.
  • When recording is finished, you are now lying on the couch. The body and mind are quite relaxed.
  • Open your eyes. Let your eyes relax. Don’t focus on anything in particular.
  • Keep lying on the couch for another 15 minutes, simply lying there, relaxed, with attention on nothing in particular. Increase this time by small increments of 5 minutes.
  • The main instruction is: don’t try to do anything, just be present and observe. You can observe body, breath, posture, contact, the senses, mind, ‘the pusher’, tendency to want to do something, etc. Whatever comes into attention is your object. Don’t try to focus on anything in particular. Don't try to achieve anything. Be present to whatever there is. You might follow breath for short time, or - when you feel some resistance towards your experience - you might sometimes ask yourself questions like “what is this?”, “what am I feeling”?

Off course this experiment is an invitation. Maybe this instructions will suit you more... Please note I said 'suit', not benefit. ;)

Alex

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #53 on: January 30, 2016, 11:20:55 AM »
Thank you for the explanation, Alex. That's exactly what all the people are saying me. It's probably true that we wouldn't change in the safety of our meditation room. But I really did as if I had nothing all the last years. I ever was "in the red". I don't know if the expression exists in english, but you will probably understand what I mean : D
I made studies, lived with roommates, was in a football team, had a girlfriend, had a job, went out.. had what people name "a normal life".
But it just made me exhausted every time, like if I never had the opportunity to breathe again.

Actually, I'm afraid don't understand what you mean, especially about "in the red". ;)

Anarcho

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #54 on: January 30, 2016, 01:25:35 PM »
Hahah ok. I just meant that I was "pushing" a lot. Every specialist says that we have to keep doing as if there was nothing. So that's what I did during so many years. But it never helped into my specific case. Everyone is different.
It's cool that this method could help you a little bit too. In fact, my audio is not in english and only talks about contracting parts of the body and watching the relaxation.
Thank you by the way for your additional proposition. That's almost what I did. I made it longer by watching all the tensions disappearing. It was even more efficient like this and you could maybe try it too.

I will try your proposition next time, but ïn fact, I have lot of difficulties to have no expectations and it's a bit the same problem here. Every time I practice Vipassana, I m aware that I really want to feel what I felt before with my practice. And I observe that I'm ever trying to change my way to meditate to obtain it. It was so easy before that I dont accept how it is now for months. I m for sure not a good meditationer. Anyway, I m still trying to do it more right.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2016, 01:28:20 PM by Anarcho »

Alex

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #55 on: January 30, 2016, 04:58:59 PM »
I will try your proposition next time, but ïn fact, I have lot of difficulties to have no expectations and it's a bit the same problem here. Every time I practice Vipassana, I m aware that I really want to feel what I felt before with my practice. And I observe that I'm ever trying to change my way to meditate to obtain it. It was so easy before that I dont accept how it is now for months. I m for sure not a good meditationer. Anyway, I m still trying to do it more right.

The invitation is to stop trying to be a good meditator and simply observe what is there.

For example "Ah, this is what it feels like to want things differently. Interesting. I will simply stay present with those thoughts and feelings of wanting things differently. I don't have to do anything. That would be more trying and controlling."


;)

Alex

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #56 on: January 30, 2016, 05:06:41 PM »
Or said in yet another way: it's okay to have expectations. They don't make you a bad meditator. It simply means you are human. ;) Just observe what happens. Don't try to change.

Anarcho

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #57 on: September 29, 2016, 04:11:43 PM »
Hello,

I'm still alive and hope that everyone is going well  :)
I'm going much better and have no more problems with these pressures into the head. I now mostly feel tensions into the legs.

Anyway, I'm practicing since more than one year now and never felt anymore the free flow like I ever experienced during the lesson.
Some people would say that it doesn't matter but that's how the meditation was the most efficient for the period after it.

What could be te reason?
Thanks in advance
« Last Edit: September 29, 2016, 04:15:08 PM by Anarcho »

Laurent

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #58 on: September 29, 2016, 11:48:38 PM »
Hello,

I'm still alive and hope that everyone is going well  :)
I'm going much better and have no more problems with these pressures into the head. I now mostly feel tensions into the legs.

Anyway, I'm practicing since more than one year now and never felt anymore the free flow like I ever experienced during the lesson.
Some people would say that it doesn't matter but that's how the meditation was the most efficient for the period after it.

What could be te reason?
Thanks in advance

Hello,

I feel this free flow comes with concentration but not only.
It is only states, which pass. The gross and unpleasant sensations are a good sign for me, as well as free flow.
What you should wish, rather than the free flow, is the feeling of being detached from sensations, they are very present but don't affect you anymore. It is a real feeling that happen with this meditation. In my opinion, the first big progress in this method. When it happens you naturally feel alleviation and a great faith to Dhamma. Sensations can be gross or subtle, this doesn't change that you are temporarily free from their influence. This produces joy and comfort, but not from sensations.
In this technique, the theory is that you are purifying mind by letting go all those sensations, noticing them. Sankharas arise and show themselves as sensations. It can remain some time, but they all pass. It changes permanently when we don't sustain them.
It is inevitable that we have difficult moments and pleasant moments because in this theory, aversion is eradicated when arising unpleasant sensations and not reacting to them with aversion. We should apply the effort of non craving and non aversion. Craving is eradicated by observing pleasant sensations without reacting with attachment to them.
When we are eradicating progressively craving and aversion, we should less suffer.
Sometimes , not reacting is easy because it is obvious that they are sankharas (very strange sensations that stop when meditation stops), sometimes this is difficult because we go through a lasting bad trip which continues even when meditation stops and we can easily worry about it. But in the case of strange sensations, it should obviously be some sankharas arising. We have to try to let go this anxiety, and keep attentive in daily life, when it happens. Worry is the first step to anxiety and mental distress.
This technique is taught to eradicate stress but can lead to stress when reacting with more and more anxiety.
What i can say is that severe pain can be feel as sting when mind is very attentive and concentrated. Worrying is largely worse than physical pain. See the Salatta Sutta.
Metta.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2016, 12:12:11 AM by Laurent »

Anarcho

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #59 on: September 30, 2016, 09:30:49 AM »
Thank you very much Laurent for the kind answer.

By the way, I have problems to breath every time since something like 5 years, probably due to the anxiety.
I feel pains and discomfort in the area of the neck. I feel like if I was totally missing air. It makes all the body in a discomfort.

Do you think it could be possible to observe it with equanimity? Could it be old sankharas that I sustain with the reaction that I have to breath ever stronger to have enough air?

It's difficult, cause it's a little bit like not moving into some ice water. If you are absolutely calm, you can feel no more cold. But if you begin to be afraid a little bit, you will only be in a process of resistance and it can make things really worse.
I think it's a little bit what you said in your last message.

Laurent

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #60 on: September 30, 2016, 07:29:24 PM »
Thank you very much Laurent for the kind answer.

By the way, I have problems to breath every time since something like 5 years, probably due to the anxiety.
I feel pains and discomfort in the area of the neck. I feel like if I was totally missing air. It makes all the body in a discomfort.

Do you think it could be possible to observe it with equanimity? Could it be old sankharas that I sustain with the reaction that I have to breath ever stronger to have enough air?

It's difficult, cause it's a little bit like not moving into some ice water. If you are absolutely calm, you can feel no more cold. But if you begin to be afraid a little bit, you will only be in a process of resistance and it can make things really worse.
I think it's a little bit what you said in your last message.

We have a stock of passive stress that arises continually. This appear with emotions, sensations, thoughts.
When this appears, this is about to disappear, it is its nature: impermanent. But it can't disappear if it does not appear first.
So it is necessary  that bad things appear before they could disappear. It is a good sign.
Buddha used a metaphor of a burning fire. The fire continues to burn even when you don't sustain it, due to the stock of aliments, but is on the way to go out, if we don't sustain it. You should feel it weakens progressively.

In a sense, dhamma is the ultimate relaxation method until nibbana and you can regard meditation this way.
It should be helpful in your practice.
If you begin to meditate with the project of relaxing yourself from all this stress, you can probably understand by yourself what to do and what to avoid.
Do whatever you feel you need to relax yourself. If you feel relaxing yourself by breathing strongly, this is the best method for you here and now. If you feel you have to change posture, change it. If you want to be lying on the floor, just do it. Observe it all.
There are much relaxation methods that work, meditation is only the perfect one, not the only one.
Being a statue of buddha is not a cause of liberation. Some people become statues of buddha while meditating, but it is a consequence, not a cause. This is when you are very very deeply relaxed.
You should always feel more relaxed after than before meditating, otherwise there is a problem.
I wish you have a real and memorable experience of depth in meditation that will clear doubts a long time.

Metta.




« Last Edit: September 30, 2016, 07:52:22 PM by Laurent »

Anarcho

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Re: Huge pressure into the whole head
« Reply #61 on: October 01, 2016, 09:05:48 AM »
Thank you very much Laurent. I will watch my meditationn in a different way.