Author Topic: Basic on Meditation  (Read 1050 times)

Peter

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Basic on Meditation
« on: May 27, 2015, 06:33:31 AM »
Hello,
Due to my busy schedule, I have not been able calm my mind.
So that's why I am trying to focus some of my morning time and evening time on meditation.
I was wondering how should I start focusing on the meditation. How can I calm my mind and is it possible with meditation?
Thank You
"Prayer is not asking. It is a longing of the soul. It is daily admission of one's weakness. It is better in prayer to have a heart without words than words without a heart."
:D

Vivek

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2015, 09:46:13 AM »
Check out the home page of this website.
Let's go beyond this illusion, shall we?

paxton9

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2020, 03:26:20 PM »
Hii
Thanks for instructions.
I feel my mind is not taking rest and I've thoughtfull mind in a day.but I can't stop the thoughts and today I started meditation for calm.

Dhamma

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2020, 05:03:01 PM »
Hii
Thanks for instructions.
I feel my mind is not taking rest and I've thoughtfull mind in a day.but I can't stop the thoughts and today I started meditation for calm.

Yes, resting the mind is very important, but it is also very important to watch the mind and the associated bodily sensations when you feel terrible. We have to do this to see the impermanence and lack of inherent value in our very negative emotions.

Much love in the Dharma,
Dhamma

Katia

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2020, 02:40:44 AM »
It takes time.  It's not going to happen quickly.  (Trust me, I know...)  But maybe part of calming the mind is learning to be patient with the process.  :)

Dhamma

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2020, 06:49:46 PM »
It takes time.  It's not going to happen quickly.  (Trust me, I know...)  But maybe part of calming the mind is learning to be patient with the process.  :)

Isn't that the truth!  The mind is a layer upon layers of cobwebs. and you have to go through all of them to understand your thoughts and feelings.  The more cobwebs you go through, the more you start to see ultimate reality, which leads to greater peace and happiness.

Peace and enlightenment to all. :)

NewPathForward

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2020, 03:03:21 PM »
Yes, resting the mind is very important, but it is also very important to watch the mind and the associated bodily sensations when you feel terrible. We have to do this to see the impermanence and lack of inherent value in our very negative emotions.

Much love in the Dharma,
Dhamma

Would you also say it is also important to observe body sensations when feeling good, calm etc?  Doing so when feeling anxiety, anger, stress, etc is becoming slightly more natural as it seems the only mindful thing to do at those times, but would doing the same when feeling good or relaxed lead to attachment so these sensations?

Dhamma

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Re: Basic on Meditation
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2020, 12:55:47 AM »
Would you also say it is also important to observe body sensations when feeling good, calm etc?  Doing so when feeling anxiety, anger, stress, etc is becoming slightly more natural as it seems the only mindful thing to do at those times, but would doing the same when feeling good or relaxed lead to attachment so these sensations?

Yes, we are always to be aware of thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations - not just negative ones.  We are not to cling to any emotion, even though we want positive ones. And just like the negative ones, we let the positive ones come and go.  Doing this all the time trains the mind to accept impermanence and to see equanimity (neither good or bad); and this leads ultimately to a lasting state of peace with all phenomena that arises.

All the best, friend :)
« Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 12:58:13 AM by Dhamma »

 

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