Author Topic: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins  (Read 3062 times)

Dharmic Tui

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Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« on: September 07, 2014, 08:07:17 PM »
A talk by Robert K Hall summing up the aims and challenges of the path on his 80th birthday. I'd highly recommend this especially to people in the early stages of practice:

http://roberthalldharmatalks.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/dharma-talk-robert-k-hall-02-09-14.mp3

Middleway

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2014, 01:57:27 AM »
Excellent talk. Robert K Hall very succinctly described what enlightenment is all about and what is our true nature. Thanks for sharing this dharma talk.

Kindly,

Middleway 

edit: This 40 min talk alone convinced me that Robert K Hall is an enlightened person.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2014, 02:05:00 AM by Middleway »
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Quardamon

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2014, 08:15:28 PM »
A few quotes from his talk:
"At adulthood, we get lost in a personality."
"You accumulate stories in your life. As we grow older, they begin to suffocate us."
"We become possessive of our stories, even in the midst of our suffering. (I saw this as a psychotherapist.)"
"Searching happens. A path arises - by grace, I think. It does not happen to everyone."
"With deepening you see: You do not have to believe the thoughts."
"What is your alternative, once you have started awakening? You have nowhere to go back to. So it is important to acknowlegde the wonder, the mystery, the incredible."

The person who speaks here is a psychiatrist and a lay Buddhist priest.  Once a student of Fritz Perls and Ida Rolf, he has been a pioneer in the integration of Gestalt psychology, bodywork, and meditation for many years.

Middleway

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2014, 01:48:55 AM »
He declares that the good news is that there is a "self" and goes onto to describe it. What are your thoughts about this statement DT and Q?

Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Quardamon

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2014, 09:49:15 PM »
I am not sure what you are asking, Middleway. I hope that you are not starting another discussion on what "self" is. :(
He talks about an experience that he calls "true self" - not just "self". And he is quite specific.

Listening to him again, and for a third time, I am inclined to listen to his talk and voice, the way I read a poem. Of course he explains a view on life, a philosophy - and the experience of life of an old man, who was and is inquisitive and thoughtful.
For instance at minute 12:30: "It always seems that the events come from outside and are put upon us. It becomes so specific that your name is an event that occurred. Someone named you."
He speaks with beauty and wisdom.

There are only a few instances that I take so much distance, that I have "thoughts about his statement".
For instance at this point: I agree with him, that at adulthood we get lost in personality. But I would not name it as "getting lost". I would name it as "taking on" a personality. I remember, that my son really needed to have a form, he asked for it. Even from school, he got as homework to ask his parents what they thought would be a career or interest that he could pursue in this life. Even as a child, he needed to take on form more and more, and he wanted that. He had a hard time with me as a father, who has this fluidity and versatility and who is always unsure about who he is. Thanks God ;) my wife is very different from that. And he sees, that I take on personalities: as a job, as a rower, as a volunteer at the dance evenings, as a participant on Vipassanaforum. ;)

Also, this man is more romantic, and more enticing than I am, about following this path.

Is this a proper reaction to your question?

Middleway

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2014, 01:43:12 AM »
Yes, Robert talks about the true self. I was recalling from memory. I agree with his entire talk and particularly the first 8:02 minutes when he describes the true self. No, I do not intend to start another discussion on "self". I have expressed my views on the subject elsewhere in the forum. Thanks for the response.

Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Marc

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2014, 08:26:12 PM »
Thank you DM, i needed this today. Meditation is really everything, im very glad that ive found it. What a waste life can be

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2014, 09:27:44 PM »
Hope it was of some benefit.

One thing that often challenges me is how a lot of these heavily experienced people will claim the endpoint of practice is love, happiness, etc. It seems a little paradoxical to letting go of thoughts that one ends up arriving at a state that sits in the peripheral of one's emotional gamut. But in saying that, perhaps once one lets go of all the tension and clinging and aversion, once it stops being about me, love and happiness are the most likely outcomes.

Middleway

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Re: Succinctly summed up in 40 mins
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2014, 01:22:47 PM »
Hope it was of some benefit.

One thing that often challenges me is how a lot of these heavily experienced people will claim the endpoint of practice is love, happiness, etc. It seems a little paradoxical to letting go of thoughts that one ends up arriving at a state that sits in the peripheral of one's emotional gamut. But in saying that, perhaps once one lets go of all the tension and clinging and aversion, once it stops being about me, love and happiness are the most likely outcomes.


Existence is suffering. The endpoint of practice is end of suffering. First we realize that we are not this body and mind. This results in experiencing the unity of existence. This is when we feel love and compassion towards the existence (us included). Then we realize that we are not this existence and awaken to our true nature. That is the end to suffering. We toggle between these two states at will until we finally die.

Robert tries to explain this in the following talk (my understanding of his talk anyways).

https://roberthalldharmatalks.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/no-controller-no-creator/
« Last Edit: October 13, 2014, 01:27:56 PM by Middleway »
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.