Author Topic: Where is God in Buddhism?  (Read 15803 times)

VinceField

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Where is God in Buddhism?
« on: June 17, 2014, 04:28:55 PM »
My understanding of Buddhism is that the idea of God is not taught or believed in. I am curious as to people's opinions about this, what your belief in God is and how it ties in with the Buddhist philosophies and practices that you follow. It seems a bit odd that an enlightened being such as the Buddha wouldn't have first hand knowledge or insights into the true nature of God. Perhaps I am missing some perspective that can be offered by those more knowledgeable on the subject.

I understand that there are different definitions of God- the definition I am referring to is the core divine consciousness that is fundamental to all creations in existence, comprising the very core essence of the entire multidimensional infinite universe, God is an incomprehensibly vast, intelligent and unconditionally loving power, the creator of everything, experiencing itself in an infinite variety of expressions through it's own creations.

I have experienced the reality of God in the terms I have just described during some of my higher-level out of body experiences in which I shed through the coarser levels of my self and accessed a higher divine aspect of my being, experiencing myself as One with God and all consciousness in existence in a state of inconceivable divine bliss and unconditional love, and experienced direct knowledge of the higher/deeper dimensions of my being which included experiencing the nature of God first hand, although much of the insight gained during these experiences cannot be fully comprehended by my limited physically-oriented mind or accurately translated or described by our limited terms and language.

So if an unenlightened being such as me, or many of the other explorers of consciousness in higher spiritual realms, or individuals having near death experiences, if us laymen can gain glimpses into the true nature of God, why is there a disconnect from this in Buddhist philosophy?

Matthew

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2014, 05:28:12 PM »
Beliefs aren't useful. Knowledge is.

The Buddha did not deny "God" - mostly he refused to discuss the issue, yet when he did he stated "God" was subject to the laws of Karma and not "the creator".

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I have experienced the reality of God in the terms I have just described

No, what you have experienced is your interpretation of sense data IN RELATION to your programmed mind-set: as society has delivered it to you.

It may be "God" (or not) - but until you have completely dissembled the programmed mind-set society gave you you are, quite literally, in no position to state anything meaningful about what you actually encountered.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2014, 07:17:35 PM »
I struggle enough reconciling myself in the universe, let alone a God. But if we subscribe to dependent origination, and marry up what we know of disciplines of evolution and astrophysics there isn't much of a place for a God entity that can be applied with much meaning.

As Matthew alluded God exists mainly due to pre-conditioning, each to their own if you want to marry it up with some form of mindfulness, but it's going to result in some rather subjective experiences.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2014, 07:31:38 PM »
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Beliefs aren't useful. Knowledge is.

I was simply asking why Buddha did not have or did not disclose knowledge of God if he was in fact enlightened.  And I would like the knowledge of what other Buddhist practitioners believe about God. :)  And I would disagree that beliefs are not useful, but I don't want to get off topic so I'll leave it at that. 

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No, what you have experienced is your interpretation of sense data IN RELATION to your programmed mind-set: as society has delivered it to you.

I believe there is a difference between experience and the interpretation of experience.  For example, during the higher-level experiences I mentioned, I did in fact experience the true energy of God and a real state of Oneness with God as well as higher levels of direct spiritual knowledge.  This is something that must be experienced to know for sure, but in these higher states of consciousness one is not tied down by the limiting constructs of the physically-attuned mind.  It is like awaking from a dream, the dream being one's physical reality, and the new awakened reality being the true spiritual nature of the self and reality that one is now aware of.  Now, my interpretation of this experience is something that indeed had to filter into my conscious mind and through all of the cultural programming that is ingrained in my current limited sense of reality.  However, there is an unmistakeable state of knowing while in these higher states which escapes full comprehension in physical terms, but it is something that must be experienced to truly understand.  This has been confirmed by many other explorers of higher realms of consciousness, as well as those having near death experiences in which the same spiritual dimensions and the nature of God are experienced.

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It may be "God" (or not) - but until you have completely dissembled the programmed mind-set society gave you you are, quite literally, in no position to state anything meaningful about what you actually encountered.

I say that until you have had the same experiences that I have, you are in no position to state anything meaningful about what I actually encountered.  Perhaps a better way to respond is by pointing to the absurdity of claiming that an individual cannot make meaningful statements about their own experiences, while attempting to make a meaningful statement about the other person's experience!  I agree that the true nature of our experiences, especially spiritual experiences, cannot be fully comprehended in all their depth with a limited mindset.     
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 08:27:30 PM by VinceField »

Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2014, 07:45:07 PM »
if you really experienced god then you wouldnt be asking what we think or other religion think

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2014, 08:43:23 PM »
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if you really experienced god then you wouldnt be asking what we think or other religion think

I fail to see the logic here, although this thread is not about me proving my experiences, but rather of discussion about what the members here believe about God and how it relates to Buddhist philosophy and practice.

I only briefly described my experiences to demonstrated that there is legitimacy to the concept of God in the sense that I described and it can be experienced by ordinary people, and if someone as unenlightened as me or any of the many other individuals who have had similar experiences of God- first hand knowledge of God- can gain this knowledge- as limited as it may be- why didn't the Buddha, or why didn't he discuss it if he did? 

One idea is that it is unimportant to the practice.  I can see how this could be true.  However, I find that contemplating God while meditating, allowing God's presence to be felt within, brings on the feeling of the energy of God, the unconditional love of God, within my heart, and this greatly enhances my metta-tations.   
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 08:45:38 PM by VinceField »

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2014, 09:00:48 PM »
However, I find that contemplating God while meditating, allowing God's presence to be felt within, brings on the feeling of the energy of God, the unconditional love of God, within my heart, and this greatly enhances my metta-tations.
Can't you see how this is conditioning? Replace "God" with basically anything and one could appear to truly experience anything. For instance, if I meditate while contemplating unicorns, allow the presence of Unicorns to be felt within, bring on the feeling of the energy of Unicorns, their unconditional love within my heart, I will possibly come to believe I've experienced the true reality of Unicorns.

What you're doing is the antithesis of what the Buddha was driving at. Which is probably why he didn't speak too much about it.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2014, 09:27:05 PM »
Dharmic Tui

I understand what you have said.  The difference between contemplating God and contemplating unicorns is firstly in the definition of God.  When one sees God as simply the core essence of one's very being, the divine nature of the self, without the other dogma associated with various religions- this to me is contemplating God, using my definition that I have based on my experiences of God in higher spiritual realms, based on first hand experience and having little to do with dogmas, for I have not followed any particular religions or philosophies aside from what my experiences have demonstrated as truth or possible truth.  For me, contemplating God during meditation is simply feeling for the deepest layer of my self while being mindful of the divine nature of my being, and remembering the unconditional loving energy and infinite knowledge that I have experienced during my experiences as being One with God. 

It is not a conscious fabrication to feel this unconditional love arise during these meditations- it is rather a byproduct of experiencing the deeper layers of my being, arising naturally.  I am not contemplating anything "out there,"  I am simply contemplating (experiencing is a better word, for there is no thought involved) my true divine self and the Source of which I am part of.

I realize that it may be difficult to accurately understand the infinitely vast divine power (or as I have been calling, God) that I am speaking of without the first hand experience. 
« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 09:31:23 PM by VinceField »

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2014, 09:48:22 PM »
Given that last post you're shoehorning a word (god) with preconceived meaning where it doesn't need to be in a highly subjective way. I could allocate the word Unicorn into what im doing and make much the same argument as you are.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #9 on: June 17, 2014, 11:20:44 PM »
Well thank you for your opinion sir, but if you have had similar experiences of unification with God consciousness in higher nonphysical dimensions like the ones I have only vaguely described and fully understood the concept of God that I am referring to (which includes aspects which I have not even conveyed) , I believe you would have a better understanding.  And I wouldn't expect you to.  I say this simply to demonstrate that your view is a tad bit short-sighted, as you are not coming from a place of experience or true knowledge of the issue you are addressing.  You have expressed your views of God and I would say your work here is done.  Thanks  :-*

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #10 on: June 17, 2014, 11:57:05 PM »
There's nothing to say I haven't had the same experiences and I just haven't attributed a concept like God to it. I could allocate some whimsical belief to what my practice and experience manifests but I stopped doing that a while ago because I could see how it taints that experience. It's like telling yourself why a vista is beautiful instead of just experiencing the vista.

The fact your perspective rests on a notion of "you haven't experienced what I have" should indicate something.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2014, 01:53:01 AM »
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There's nothing to say I haven't had the same experiences and I just haven't attributed a concept like God to it.

Hey you are right, perhaps you are an experienced and developed out of body traveler with the ability to phase into the higher spectrum of nonphysical dimensions.  Of course, if you experienced the direct knowledge of these experiences, you wouldn't have to attribute any concept to your experience that wasn't already made known to you during the experience itself.

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I could allocate some whimsical belief to what my practice and experience manifests

You could absolutely do this, although it is not recommended.  Of course, this has nothing to do with my experience.  But I appreciate the insinuation.   :D

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It's like telling yourself why a vista is beautiful instead of just experiencing the vista.

In my opinion, an experience does little good unless meaning can be extracted from it and it is assimilated in one's consciousness in a way in which one can benefit from it in some manner.

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The fact your perspective rests on a notion of "you haven't experienced what I have" should indicate something.

This is a false statement my friend.  My perspective rests on my personal experience and has no relation to the experiences (or non-experiences) of others except that certain aspects of my experiences have been confirmed by those having similar experiences.  The notion that "you haven't experienced what I have," which is a distortion of my previous message by the way, well, it is what it is.  Being into Buddhism, I'm sure you know that it is all about personal experience, that only experience brings knowledge.  So if you don't have the experience, you don't have the knowledge.  You have belief at best.  My perspective at this point is simply that you do not have the proper knowledge or experience to accurately judge or even comprehend the nature of my experiences ,unless you somehow had joined me during my out of body experiences and meditations and you then psychically probed my mind and learned the entire conceptual basis of my understandings gained from those experiences.  We're on different wavelengths bro.  You only think you know what it's like to be on mine, but you don't have the experience of it.  (I am not insinuating a "higher" wavelength or superiority in any way, but simply a factual distinction in our experience base)


If anyone is interested in reading on-topic posts that actually discuss the issues that I raised and the original purpose of the thread, take a look here: http://www.dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=21031  It is quite informative, and in addition to addressing the original topic, they managed to not criticize or challenge my experiences.  Impressive.

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2014, 02:56:18 AM »
Hey you are right, perhaps you are an experienced and developed out of body traveler with the ability to phase into the higher spectrum of nonphysical dimensions.  Of course, if you experienced the direct knowledge of these experiences, you wouldn't have to attribute any concept to your experience that wasn't already made known to you during the experience itself.
Unless of course I went into it telling myself I was looking for something or trying to find meaning.
In my opinion, an experience does little good unless meaning can be extracted from it and it is assimilated in one's consciousness in a way in which one can benefit from it in some manner.
Why must one benefit and derive meaning? Why can’t things just exist. My belief is that true freedom exists when the desire for meaning is extinguished.
This is a false statement my friend.  My perspective rests on my personal experience and has no relation to the experiences (or non-experiences) of others except that certain aspects of my experiences have been confirmed by those having similar experiences.  The notion that "you haven't experienced what I have," which is a distortion of my previous message by the way, well, it is what it is.
I’m not sure what your purpose is in this thread then. On one hand, you’re trying to establish or talk about “God” (as experienced by yourself), and then on the other wondering why the Buddha didn’t talk about something that relates to your personal experience, which may not be independently observable. On the surface the logical conclusion is that “God” isn’t something that will likely manifest from Vipassana (or other forms of Buddhist) meditation
Being into Buddhism, I'm sure you know that it is all about personal experience, that only experience brings knowledge. 
Information or reason brings knowledge. Experience brings wisdom. There’s a distinction there.
It is quite informative, and in addition to addressing the original topic, they managed to not criticize or challenge my experiences.  Impressive.
I see people conversing with you along the same lines. Some of them are getting into text, which I'm not huge on, but overall the general view appears the same. I'm not criticising you, your view and experience is just that. But if you’re wanting someone to blindly agree with you and just accept things at face value I’m probably not your man. I've been subjected to too many unsubstantiated claims, so all I have is a lucky chance that you've somehow cracked a true reality or God where so many others have been misled, and I'm not that good a gambler. What I'll never deny anyone is their subjective experience though and am extremely open minded there.

If you want to flesh out your experience we can look into it. On the surface your God sounds a bit like a Vedic or Brahman interpretation of God, which is not as easily dismissable as an Abrahamic God, although it’s far harder to define or attribute meaning to in everyday life. The need to measure things in such a way is very much in the realm of the ego.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 05:51:28 AM by Dharmic Tui »

Matthew

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #13 on: June 18, 2014, 06:33:51 AM »
The difference between contemplating God and contemplating unicorns is firstly in the definition of God.  When one sees God as simply the core essence of one's very being, the divine nature of the self, remembering the unconditional loving energy and infinite knowledge that I have experienced during my experiences as being One with God. 

It is not a conscious fabrication to feel this unconditional love arise during these meditations- it is rather a byproduct of experiencing the deeper layers of my being ... contemplating (experiencing is a better word, for there is no thought involved) my true divine self and the Source of which I am part of.

1 Buddha denied self as having any inherent existence - it's a mental construct (fabrication) and very sticky (hard to see through)

2 "the definition of God" is another mental construct/fabrication

3 Buddhist practice is about seeing things as they are, beyond the conditioning of words

4 you seen to have no idea of how strongly the conditioning is constructed: the notion of God is deeply embedded in the fabric of human life, our taught moral and ethical codes - and entire educational system, our systems of economics, finance and ownership, our political systems

In short you have deeply ingrained beliefs about "God" and when you encounter something you find hard to bring back to the world in words you have a habit of assigning it to God, which is ego at work. If you continued the investigation of phenomena instead of running down the hill into the village claiming you've seen God you might get somewhere.

You say you are interested in other's beliefs about "God". Such things are no less valid than their beliefs about unicorns or UFOs - they are all equally useless.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

Middleway

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2014, 09:03:44 AM »
Buddha must have experienced God but probably did not talk about it because people will misunderstand and kill each other in the name of God. Buddhists are the most peaceful people in the world.

I believe all enlightened people experience God. Vincefield, if you experienced God, you must be enlightened. Then why do you say you are not enlightened?
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2014, 06:07:55 PM »
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I’m not sure what your purpose is in this thread then. On one hand, you’re trying to establish or talk about “God” (as experienced by yourself), and then on the other wondering why the Buddha didn’t talk about something that relates to your personal experience, which may not be independently observable.

From my first post, first line: 
Quote
My understanding of Buddhism is that the idea of God is not taught or believed in. I am curious as to people's opinions about this, what your belief in God is and how it ties in with the Buddhist philosophies and practices that you follow....Perhaps I am missing some perspective that can be offered by those more knowledgeable on the subject.

The rest of the post's purpose is to simple give people an idea of what I mean by God and the idea that I am not coming from belief, but from experience, which is a big part of Buddhism. 

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I see people conversing with you along the same lines.

Not one person questioned the validity of my practices or experiences.  Rather, they delved right into the subject matter presented, which is Buddhist philosophies of God and their opinions about God and how it relates to Buddhist practice.

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If you want to flesh out your experience we can look into it. On the surface your God sounds a bit like a Vedic or Brahman interpretation of God, which is not as easily dismissable as an Abrahamic God, although it’s far harder to define or attribute meaning to in everyday life. The need to measure things in such a way is very much in the realm of the ego.

Again, this is not the purpose of this thread.  You can say that I am egotistical for understanding the meaning of my experiences, but this to me is no different from understanding the significance of entering the Jhanas.  I do not need to search for meaning, I experience it as direct knowledge during my experiences.  If translating this knowledge into terms that myself and others can understand is egotistical, than I suppose the Buddha was rather egotistic as well, for that's all he ever did.   

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In short you have deeply ingrained beliefs about "God" and when you encounter something you find hard to bring back to the world in words you have a habit of assigning it to God, which is ego at work.

Again you are assuming to have knowledge about the nature of my experience, but also the nature of my beliefs of God and my habits!  I did not assign these experiences to God, I simply put into words the nature of the direct knowledge that I experienced, which was experiencing myself as the omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, fundamental creative and all-loving force within all things, that comprises the entire multidimensional universe at the core, fundamental level, from which all experience arises.  A voice did not say, "this is God!" but I understood what it was that I was experiencing without a shadow of a doubt.  God is just a word, rather simplistic one at that, but it is the most accurate word that I have found to describe the full spectrum of the concept that I experienced.  I have also called it "All That Is" and "Source."  None of these words do it any true justice.  It must be experienced to be truly understood.

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If you continued the investigation of phenomena instead of running down the hill into the village claiming you've seen God you might get somewhere.

Again, you are erroneously assuming- assuming both that I have not continued investigating, and assuming that I have not gotten anywhere with it.  Both false.  You are also casting a negative light on my sharing of my experiences and findings, which is inherently a reflection of the negativity within yourself.

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #16 on: June 18, 2014, 06:36:13 PM »
Middleway

There is a difference between the idea that all enlightened people experience God, and the idea that ONLY enlightened people experience God.  In your belief system, is it possible for an unenlightened person such as myself to experience God? 

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #17 on: June 18, 2014, 07:13:58 PM »
Not one person questioned the validity of my practices or experiences.
I'm not either. I believe you genuinely believe what you do. Some of them touched on something I've merely fleshed out a bit more.
Again, this is not the purpose of this thread.  You can say that I am egotistical for understanding the meaning of my experiences, but this to me is no different from understanding the significance of entering the Jhanas.
Then you have an incomplete knowledge of Vipassana, and Jhanas. And you don't even have to experience them to comprehend that.

I do not need to search for meaning

This:
In my opinion, an experience does little good unless meaning can be extracted from it and it is assimilated in one's consciousness

Would suggest otherwise. It would appear you have a need to measure and make significant your experience. Of course that's very common for humans and only natural.

"I have also called it "All That Is" and "Source."
So which one is it then? You've just demonstrated exactly what is being said to you, you're shoehorning preconceptions into your experience. One day it's "god" you're experiencing, the next it's the "Source" or "All That Is", tomorrow it might be "Qi", "Mana" or "Prana". In fact from the limited information you've given "God" in it's most commonly understood form in contemporary culture is the least compatible of those names you could have attributed to your experience.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 07:19:14 PM by Dharmic Tui »

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #18 on: June 18, 2014, 08:06:48 PM »
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Then you have an incomplete knowledge of Vipassana, and Jhanas. And you don't even have to experience them to comprehend that.

How so?  Please explain.

Quote
"I do not need to search for meaning".....This would suggest otherwise. It would appear you have a need to measure and make significant your experience.

I was speaking solely about my experiences with God consciousness when I stated that I do not need to search for meaning, and if you had quoted the entire statement you would see that you have taken this out of context, for I went on to say that the reason I don't need to search for meaning is because I experienced the truth of the experiences first hand as they took place with full understanding.  There is no need to further assign significance outside of what was revealed during the experiences themselves. 

Quote
"I have also called it "All That Is" and "Source."
So which one is it then? You've just demonstrated exactly what is being said to you, you're shoehorning preconceptions into your experience. One day it's "god" you're experiencing, the next it's the "Source" or "All That Is",

You are missing the point.  These are just names that cannot accurately contain the full breadth of the concept of which I am speaking of.  These names and the preconceptions associated with them have no influence on what was experienced.  Forget any of the names I have used, scrap the word God, Source, or any other synonymous or similar label, and look into the brief yet concise descriptions I have given for the experiences and don't get so hung up on the names or labels. 

Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2014, 08:14:10 PM »
This is my guess of why Buddha never wanted experience of god to be included in the teaching - Experiencing just the presence of god will not free the mind from the suffering. Even the Experience of god is a impermanent experience hence is fundamentally suffering attached to it.

If your experience of god has freed your mind from all the mental impurities then please let us know. I would be happy to try and experience the same thing.

But as i see you are still stuck in the field of suffering and are trying to change your mind by using the memory of the experience of god that you had. I have already tried this method during my psychedelic experimentation days and adopting knowledge into everyday activities from those experiences was impossible for me.

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2014, 08:16:37 PM »
How so?  Please explain.
Jhana's are typically only accessible once one leaves behind notions of significance or needing to comprehend. Doing so is usually an exercise in tail chasing.
I was speaking solely about my experiences with God consciousness when I stated that I do not need to search for meaning
So you're always searching for meaning except this one time when you encounter a god force?
You are missing the point.  These are just names that cannot accurately contain the full breadth of the concept of which I am speaking of.  These names and the preconceptions associated with them have no influence on what was experienced.  Forget any of the names I have used, scrap the word God, Source, or any other synonymous or similar label, and look into the brief yet concise descriptions I have given for the experiences and don't get so hung up on the names or labels.
So really the question in your OP would be more like "Why wasn't the Buddha caught up in Ontology", rather than using a limited catchall like "God".

VinceField

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2014, 08:51:20 PM »
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Jhana's are typically only accessible once one leaves behind notions of significance or needing to comprehend.

I understand that.  Does this mean that there is no significance of the experience of Jhana, or that comprehension does not take place during the experience of Jhana?  My point was that I understand my experiences just as a Buddhist understands his experiences of jhana- as direct knowledge.  This is perhaps why there is so much confusion as to what jhana actually is.  It is the translation of the direct experience into worldly terms which causes conceptual difficulties. 

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So you're always searching for meaning except this one time when you encounter a god force?

Well firstly, it wasn't just one time, and secondly, if you use some logic you will understand how there is no need to try to find the meaning of an experience if the meaning is revealed to you as part of the experience as direct knowledge.  But then again, the states of consciousness that I am referring to are of a completely different nature from normal waking states, and even much different from deeper meditative states, so I understand if it is somewhat difficult to try to imagine. 

But I stand by my notion that without understanding the meaning of our experience, there can be no wisdom, as life would simply be perceived as a meaningless series of moments and there would be no ability to relate any one experience to anything else.  I believe that wisdom is gained through the understanding of the experience.     

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2014, 09:13:23 PM »
But I stand by my notion that without understanding the meaning of our experience, there can be no wisdom, as life would simply be perceived as a meaningless series of moments and there would be no ability to relate any one experience to anything else.
Buddhism isn't really into dualism so separating and measuring things isn't a core emphasis. The wisdom comes from realising the folly in such things.

Tobin

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #23 on: June 18, 2014, 10:10:13 PM »
The replies in here are kind of aggressive. Relax guys!  >:(

But about finding the meaning of existence, this is one that sent me into a deep depression for over 5 years.

We as humans are always looking for meaning. Who is God? Why was the universe created? Why were we put on this earth? Etc.

What if there is no meaning? If we had to admit this, what would we be left with? I would think we would have to relinquish the insatiable urge to know and just start experiencing what we have right in front of our eyes.

I guess this is just a long winded version of what DT said, "The wisdom comes from realising the folly in such things." (although I would replace folly with futile)
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 10:29:47 PM by Tobin »
Regards,
Tobin

Middleway

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Re: Where is God in Buddhism?
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2014, 03:29:55 AM »
Vincefield,

If you are not enlightened, then you don't "know". If you don't know, how can you declare to the world what you have experienced is God? What you are actually saying is that you believe that you experienced God.

Btw, I would be curious to find out your understanding of what is enlightenment?

Middleway
« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 03:40:50 AM by Middleway »
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

 

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