Author Topic: Adyashanti "True meditation"  (Read 5695 times)

Mikeler

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Adyashanti "True meditation"
« on: October 13, 2013, 05:26:25 PM »
For anyone familiar with Adyashanti's teachings, you'll probably know about his way to awakening called true meditation which is basically resting in awareness with no effort from the side of the meditator. Just resting in pure awareness.

What's curious to me is that he calls things like mindfulness of breath another technique meant to manipulate and control and not really true meditation.

But isn't "true meditation" the same thing as insight meditation which is basically pure awareness?

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2013, 06:37:27 PM »
He also mentions that mindfulness is not enought which is what intrigued me about him.

Eventually it's not enough to simply detach from thinking and identification with emotions.

One has to go deeper into investigating the question "Who am I?" or even "What am I?" through meditative self-inquiry.


redalert

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2013, 07:51:00 PM »
For anyone familiar with Adyashanti's teachings, you'll probably know about his way to awakening called true meditation which is basically resting in awareness with no effort from the side of the meditator. Just resting in pure awareness.

This is a mature practice.


Eventually it's not enough to simply detach from thinking and identification with emotions.

One has to go deeper into investigating the question "Who am I?" or even "What am I?" through meditative self-inquiry.
Correct, states of concentration alone are not liberative, they merely supress the hindrances for some time. Directing this heightened state of concentration towards sensory phenomenon, will lead to liberative wisdom.

Eventually as all phenomenon dissolves away, awareness will simply become aware of awareness. This is the true nature and when this faculty is developed one can rest in pure awareness.

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2013, 08:17:17 PM »
It's a mature practice, but I'm growing tired of this subtle manipulation of mindfulness of breath.

Where is the insight? I don't have insight, all I know is how to breath into my diaphragm and detach from thoughts.

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2013, 06:56:45 AM »
Do you see thoughts and feelings arising and can you let go of them?

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2013, 11:29:47 AM »
That depends on their personal significance.

Some thoughts have no impact while others hit close to home.


redalert

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2013, 05:19:48 PM »
Where is the insight? I don't have insight, all I know is how to breath into my diaphragm and detach from thoughts.

This is purely Samadhi, you need to incorporate and develop in (morality), with this you will develop the concentration needed to begin insight practices. This concentration can be used to investigate into the nature of reality(the field of experiential wisdom).

I suggest you find a teacher you can sit with face to face to help you transition into insight practices.

A residential retreat can be invaluable in developing a base of understanding and developing a daily practice.

I'm not familiar with Adyashanti's teachings, does he offer any retreats?

If he is inaccessible to you for guidance, then perhaps look into other retreats and see if one rings home. There are several that range in different timetables and levels of intensity. The continuity of practice that occurs on retreat is very difficult to create working from home, much progress can be made in short periods of intensive work. The presence of a good teacher and fellow students can charge the atmosphere with good vibrations which are very helpful in creating a good working environment.

Kind regards,
Red   

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2013, 06:51:00 PM »
That depends on their personal significance.

Some thoughts have no impact while others hit close to home.
So how to expect insight to arise? Do you think it is something which will arrive after large amounts of contemplation? Will it hit you like a tonne of bricks, or will it be like a lotus gradually opening it's petals? Will it magically answer and solve all of your problems?

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2013, 07:02:36 PM »
Where is the insight? I don't have insight, all I know is how to breath into my diaphragm and detach from thoughts.

This is purely Samadhi, you need to incorporate and develop in (morality), with this you will develop the concentration needed to begin insight practices. This concentration can be used to investigate into the nature of reality(the field of experiential wisdom).

I suggest you find a teacher you can sit with face to face to help you transition into insight practices.

A residential retreat can be invaluable in developing a base of understanding and developing a daily practice.

I'm not familiar with Adyashanti's teachings, does he offer any retreats?

If he is inaccessible to you for guidance, then perhaps look into other retreats and see if one rings home. There are several that range in different timetables and levels of intensity. The continuity of practice that occurs on retreat is very difficult to create working from home, much progress can be made in short periods of intensive work. The presence of a good teacher and fellow students can charge the atmosphere with good vibrations which are very helpful in creating a good working environment.

Kind regards,
Red

Adya is mainly in the San Francisco bay area so I probably won't be able to attend his retreats. I'll have to attend some retreat around the London area and see how that goes.

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2013, 07:04:50 PM »
That depends on their personal significance.

Some thoughts have no impact while others hit close to home.
So how to expect insight to arise? Do you think it is something which will arrive after large amounts of contemplation? Will it hit you like a tonne of bricks, or will it be like a lotus gradually opening it's petals? Will it magically answer and solve all of your problems?

I don't know how it will arrive.

According to some teachers the only realization is that you're already awake but that sounds too simple.

I just don't know.

redalert

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2013, 07:11:43 PM »
There should be no shortage of retreats in London.

 Give a few different places a look, go in and meet the people and see if it gels with you. If you get a weird feeling, go try another, keep an open mind and I'm sure you will find the path that is right for you.

Good luck,
Red

Vivek

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2013, 08:14:27 PM »
Quote
According to some teachers the only realization is that you're already awake but that sounds too simple.
Mikeler, just set that aside for now. That may be true at some level but that is still not YOUR insight, it is not something you have arrived at through your personal journey. It looks to me like you are looking for some specific insights to come to you; looks like you are searching for them. Check for yourself if that is the case, because if it is, then you will continue to get more frustrated. I think that is what DT is also trying to hint at. If you are able to be fully with this moment and see everything arising and passing away, and you are able to let go of whatever that arises within you in the moment, that is sufficient. So, as best as you can, allow yourself to let go of the searching for insights, and just be with this moment.   
Let's go beyond this illusion, shall we?

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2013, 09:26:53 PM »
I see.

Yes, you're right I am searching for the insight in the form of "spiritual shopping". I purchase new books and new material in the hopes that it will make everything "click" for me and take me to some awakened state where I'm just walking around completely present with no suffering.

So what you're saying is that I have to have this experience for myself first?

OK, I have another question. What do you think of pure awareness meditation combined with meditative inquiry? No following the breath, no technique, just pure awareness along with having a spiritual question like "Who am I?" or "Who is having these thoughts?".

Is that how insight arises?

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2013, 10:27:52 PM »
Insight might arise that way but if you're approaching meditation with a question it's not pure awareness. If you wanted to try something just sit there and see what happens, without expecting or looking for anything. Sometimes the answers appear when the questions stop.

redalert

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2013, 01:07:47 AM »

OK, I have another question. What do you think of pure awareness meditation combined with meditative inquiry? No following the breath, no technique, just pure awareness along with having a spiritual question like "Who am I?" or "Who is having these thoughts?".

Is that how insight arises?

This sounds like the experience Eckhart Tolle had prior to awakening. He was under extreme distress and was contemplating suicide when the thought arose "I can't live with myself?" He then thought who is this self, and who is it that cannot live with it? He realized there must be two of him and at that moment a deep stillness came over him. When he awoke the next morning everything was fresh and new....

For some with little dust in the eyes very little is required, but for others a process to remove dust must be put into action.

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2013, 02:04:12 AM »
I've noticed all the spiritual teachers who say "You don't need to do mindfulness" or even "You don't need to meditate to get insight" have all meditated for years and years themselves.




Vivek

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2013, 04:56:11 AM »
Quote
I've noticed all the spiritual teachers who say "You don't need to do mindfulness" or even "You don't need to meditate to get insight" have all meditated for years and years themselves.
That is correct, Mikeler. Being familiar with Adyashanti's teachings, I can understand the perspective from which you raise your questions. I would say that we definitely need Concentration and Insight practices before we can be ready to plunge into serious Self-inquiry. Even Adyashanti himself has undergone years of practice in Zen tradition. We need Sila, Samadhi and Pannya to steady ourselves so that we can reach the stage wherein we realize that they were not needed at all. Until that point, we need all three aspects of the Dhamma. This is why Dhamma is such a wholesome path for everyone. 
Let's go beyond this illusion, shall we?

Mikeler

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2013, 02:52:00 PM »
What does Sila and Pannya mean?

I don't like delving into theory too much.

I like practical pragmatic approaches.

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2013, 06:35:56 PM »
They are morality and wisdom. While theoretical they can also be practical - it is how you conduct yourself and how you comprehend things (basic crude interpretation).

ramat

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Re: Adyashanti "True meditation"
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2013, 12:13:32 AM »
One needs well defined goal and a Master, who reached goal,  can guide on the path and also support. I am practicing Pranahuti Aided meditation from last 10 years. It has definite goal and support. Progress is also evaluated on periodic basis. Thi system helped me alot. I am very happy with life and my mind is now peaceful and moving towards goal.
I did not like breathing based meditations. This meditation method is simple and subtler.
There is a center in London also it seems They provide 2 days training generally. check this link. They have all the books also online.
MOD EDIT: LINK TO EXTERNAL WEBSITE REMOVED. PLEASE READ FORUM RULES.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2013, 06:46:17 PM by Vivek »

 

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