Author Topic: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article  (Read 3662 times)

Renze

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Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« on: March 25, 2013, 05:25:16 PM »
I follow Tricycle magazine on Facebook and they just linked to this great article from 2006:

http://www.tricycle.com/-practice/touching-enlightenment

I wonder what you guys think?

garyblackhouse

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Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2013, 08:45:27 PM »
I though it was great, thanks for posting. He talked about some things that particularly caught my attention and kind of answered a question I'd also buried beneath the surface:

Quote
WHEN ASKED “How do you exhaust karma?” Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche simply said, “When things come up in your life, you feel them completely and fully and you don’t hold back. You live them right through until they have completed themselves.” This applies to whatever is arising for us, not just what is painful, but what is pleasurable as well. When we are blissful and happy, we go along to a certain point but then pull back because we are afraid--perhaps it is too much and we feel we are losing our sense of self, or perhaps we are afraid it will slip away. This is because true bliss and true happiness, perhaps even more so than pain, are a negation of the human ego.

I've been holding back when I'm happy, almost as if I'm not worthy of such bliss. At other times, I've been avoiding unpleasantness by purposely looking for "better" thoughts when they naturally arise, as well as just trying to blank the thought and focus on an object such as the breath, it's a dirty habit. So I guess he's right, there is a tendency to not fully engage in what is happening and use meditation as a safe-guard from the depth or whatever is actually happening.

I've never heard of this earth-breathing meditation before. Perhaps it will be something I try here at home. Unless someone can give me a valid reason not to?

Peace.

DarkNightOfNoSoul

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  • Lots of sharp rocks on this here path
    • Sayagyi U Ba Khin/Goenka, Mahasi Sayadaw
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Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2013, 09:19:34 PM »
Good article, thanks Renze. My impression is that he's describing vipassana from a different perspective - though as Gary pointed out, the breathing into the earth is new to me. I notice that Reggie Ray is a keynote speaker at the Buddhist Geeks conference I'm attending in August, so I look forward to his talk.

At other times, I've been avoiding unpleasantness by purposely looking for "better" thoughts when they naturally arise, as well as just trying to blank the thought and focus on an object such as the breath, it's a dirty habit.
Interesting comment Gary, it makes me wonder if I'm using a wrong approach. I have a tendency to get into "loops" of negative thought patterns (usually after some sort of "triggering" event). These patterns of thought have in the past led to depression. Nowadays I quickly become aware of the negative thought patterns, and generally watch them for a few seconds but then discard them as unimportant and move my attention to breathing and somatic sensations. I wonder if this is the same as trying to "blank" the thought, as you say? There seems a fine line between blocking a thought and "letting it go".

Mindfullness

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Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2013, 03:17:25 AM »
Good article, thanks Renze. My impression is that he's describing vipassana from a different perspective - though as Gary pointed out, the breathing into the earth is new to me. I notice that Reggie Ray is a keynote speaker at the Buddhist Geeks conference I'm attending in August, so I look forward to his talk.

At other times, I've been avoiding unpleasantness by purposely looking for "better" thoughts when they naturally arise, as well as just trying to blank the thought and focus on an object such as the breath, it's a dirty habit.
Interesting comment Gary, it makes me wonder if I'm using a wrong approach. I have a tendency to get into "loops" of negative thought patterns (usually after some sort of "triggering" event). These patterns of thought have in the past led to depression. Nowadays I quickly become aware of the negative thought patterns, and generally watch them for a few seconds but then discard them as unimportant and move my attention to breathing and somatic sensations. I wonder if this is the same as trying to "blank" the thought, as you say? There seems a fine line between blocking a thought and "letting it go".

I have this same question. Then again, it kind of makes sense for me. I feel like I really don't appreciate the current moment for what it is although meditation is helping with that. Great article!

Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2013, 04:52:02 AM »
i would like to add a piece of information. Plz look for it in practice and much of the doubts regarding thoughts will be cleared.

there are two types of thoughts.
one is thoughts that one identifies with.
other is just thoughts.

thoughts as soon as one identifies with it stats causing suffering. it becomes a positive thought or a negative thought after one identifies with it.
if one gains awareness after the identification has taken place then one should divert the attention to body and observe the reaction of stopping that thought in the body and get back to meditation.

since the above posts mention only thoughts that are already self identified its ok to stop them, let them go.... all work the same. just observe the reactions later with equanimity.

Renze

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Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2013, 11:04:43 AM »
The whole 'observe your body' thing described in this article is actually quite an eye-opener for me. I used to think that meditation was purely a practice for your mind. I only used the sensations in my body (the feeling in the nostrils) to calm myself and concentrate. Now that I've read this article, I'm determined to switch from observing the nostrils/tip of the nose to whole body breathing as the Buddha taught it.
And yes, allow anything that arises to happen, positive or negative, this is a very good lesson!

garyblackhouse

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Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2013, 12:29:51 PM »
Interesting comment Gary, it makes me wonder if I'm using a wrong approach. I have a tendency to get into "loops" of negative thought patterns (usually after some sort of "triggering" event). These patterns of thought have in the past led to depression. Nowadays I quickly become aware of the negative thought patterns, and generally watch them for a few seconds but then discard them as unimportant and move my attention to breathing and somatic sensations. I wonder if this is the same as trying to "blank" the thought, as you say? There seems a fine line between blocking a thought and "letting it go".

I have this same question. Then again, it kind of makes sense for me. I feel like I really don't appreciate the current moment for what it is although meditation is helping with that. Great article!

A fine line indeed. I think Sid answered the question quite well, thank you Sid. I agree that with experience in daily life and practice on the cushion we will see the answers. I feel the article has given me another lesson also, it's important in life and in practice to continue to add to the "process," I don't mean to "pollute" the practice, but rather to add an important ingredient to a soup that never really stops cooking. Maybe I'm babbling, but I think to evolve as people and meditators its good to see other perspectives and continue to question our own.



Re: Touching enlightenment - a very inspiring article
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2013, 04:27:04 PM »
I feel the article has given me another lesson also, it's important in life and in practice to continue to add to the "process," I don't mean to "pollute" the practice, but rather to add an important ingredient to a soup that never really stops cooking. Maybe I'm babbling, but I think to evolve as people and meditators its good to see other perspectives and continue to question our own.

very well said. Buddha gave us the ingredients, we have to use them to make the dish that tastes good to us. Depending only for the basic foothold on the teaching and adding and subtracting what works and doesnt work for us is very important in the path. Blindly following the meditation instructions for one hour and thinking my work is done is foolish and a dead end.
- my thought

 

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