Author Topic: Gautama's teachings and the impact of the Hindu teachings on it  (Read 1674 times)

Satipatthana

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How much of what Gautama taught *do you think* was changed before it was written down and the surrounding Hindu teachings had influenced it?

I've studied much more Christianity from the theological and historical point than I have Buddhism, and I've seen this influence in the writings of the New Testament. In their case, the stories of Jesus were written just 20 - 40 years after his death and they were already greatly influenced by current events and can't be considered historically accurate.

Knowing that, and knowing that there was the oral tradition for 200 years, I suspect by the time things were written down they may have reflected more what the authors thought than what Gautama himself actually said.

The reason I bring this up is it seems the more I examine what Gautama taught in application to my own life and practice, the more the "supernatural" (?) aspects that are similar between Buddhism and Hinduism don't seem to fit.

What do you think?

Re: Gautama's teachings and the impact of the Hindu teachings on it
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2013, 10:51:17 AM »
none of the arguments will satisfy us in this matter. so as buddha taught, become an island for oneself and trust ones own mindfulness. dont cling to buddha or the sangha. they do not walk for us. everyone has to work for onself.

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How much of what Gautama taught *do you think* was changed before it was written down and the surrounding Hindu teachings had influenced it?

what buddha taught is only four noble truth and eight fold path. there is nothing in them that can be influenced or changed.

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The reason I bring this up is it seems the more I examine what Gautama taught in application to my own life and practice, the more the "supernatural" (?) aspects that are similar between Buddhism and Hinduism don't seem to fit.

accept what can be accepted and leave the rest. it might fit in in the later part of the practice. who knows.

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Knowing that, and knowing that there was the oral tradition for 200 years, I suspect by the time things were written down they may have reflected more what the authors thought than what Gautama himself actually said.

most part of the suttas are accurate as they were not allowed to tampered with.

DarkNightOfNoSoul

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    • Sayagyi U Ba Khin/Goenka, Mahasi Sayadaw
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Re: Gautama's teachings and the impact of the Hindu teachings on it
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2013, 07:33:20 PM »
Some of the contents of the Buddhist texts concern me, and I've always found the metaphysical aspects hard to swallow. But I think siddharthgode is right. First, it seems difficult to fault the basic insights and wisdom in Buddhism, such as the four noble truths. Second, unlike Christianity, it is the practice itself that is important, not the scriptures. I think we can have some confidence that the critical teachings have been retained relatively intact simply because if we put them into practice, they give results. So personally I'm reasonably comfortable putting aside the supernatural stuff (which seems derived from Hinduism, as you note) such as kamma, rebirth, and realms of existence, as the practices do seem to (eventually!) yield a shift away from negativity and towards happiness and compassion. I think that's good enough for me.

 

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