Author Topic: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy  (Read 2054 times)

lokariototal

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Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« on: February 27, 2013, 11:53:24 PM »
"(ABC Model) could be described as “as I think, so I feel (and do)!” (The link is to Learning cognitive-behavior therapy: an illustrated guide By Jesse H. Wright, Monica Ramirez Basco, Michael E. Thase.) Understanding it is as simple as A B C.

Activating Event – the actual event and the client’s immediate interpretations of the event

Beliefs about the event – this evaluation can be rational or irrational

Consequences – how you feel and what you do or other thoughts

Situation One – Negative Perspective
A - Mary is walking down the street, and her friend Sarah walks right on by.

B – Mary thinks, “Oh Sarah is such a jerk.”

C – Next time, Mary ignores Sarah.

The “B” may or may not be true. Here is another possibility.

Situation Two – Positive Perspective
[/b]
A - Mary is walking down the street, and her friend Sarah walks right on by.

B – Mary thinks, “Oh that Sarah, always distracted.”

C – Mary calls out, Sarah apologizes for missing her, and they go for coffee!
[/i]


My question is, how can mindfulness be applied to this model? Does living mindfully mean that we should have no "B", in other words, living mindfully means that we should get used to having no opinions or Judgments about the events that occur in our lives? If living mindfully means having no opinions about the events that happens in our lives, how can there be change in a person? In other words, how can the person that lives mindfully change his life if he is accepting everything that happens to him or her?

Wintermute

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Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2013, 01:13:12 AM »
OK, let's see if I've learned anything.

Mindfulness does not influence your behaviour directly, you just observe what happens. You can not force yourself to think nice thoughts, nor should you. Your reaction will depend on your state of mind, whether you have anger or compassion there. Mindfulness and meditation practice - and here I mean practicing, developing your knowledge and morality - will slowly shift you from anger towards compassion. There will be more occasions where you show compassion and you will also have more stability, so it will take stronger negative events to produce anger from you.

Please correct me if I'm wrong!

Mpgkona

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Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2013, 02:55:27 AM »
IMO living mindfully does not mean you don't have opinions. I believe living mindfully means being aware of your opinions, don't be a judge, and be equanimous to the sensation the opinion is giving you, which they most certainly do.

Also, this ABC model also comes out of Positive Behavior Support, and it varies slightly from the model you quoted.
When you change the way you look at things the things you look at change.

Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2013, 05:41:05 PM »
well here is how it works according to me.

being mindful to A.
being mindful to B. it arises and it passes away.
being mindful to C. since the sensations and reactions of B have passed away they do not influence in the action of C.

Quote
living mindfully means that we should get used to having no opinions or Judgments about the events that occur in our lives? If living mindfully means having no opinions about the events that happens in our lives, how can there be change in a person?  In other words, how can the person that lives mindfully change his life if he is accepting everything that happens to him or her?

 if he is accepting everything that happens to him or her, then that does not mean he is accepting it to be right.
he is just accepting. if it is a mistake he accepts and develops a strong will not to repeat it again.
we should have opinions and judgments on our actions, not on others.


Dharmic Tui

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Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2013, 07:45:13 PM »
It is quandaries like this which make me question the viability of secular mindfulness towards moral perspectives. By developing mindfulness without the morality of Buddhism, you would in perspective A) be less likely to follow your mind’s inherent leaning towards negative assumption and cling to it, but you’d also not be able to put much weight behind perspective B). By developing the 3 moralistic elements of the Eightfold path (right speech, action and livelihood) you would more likely bring perspective B) to mind, and less likely to jump to perspective A).

lokariototal

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Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2013, 10:59:44 PM »
OK, let's see if I've learned anything.

Mindfulness does not influence your behaviour directly, you just observe what happens. You can not force yourself to think nice thoughts, nor should you. Your reaction will depend on your state of mind, whether you have anger or compassion there. Mindfulness and meditation practice - and here I mean practicing, developing your knowledge and morality - will slowly shift you from anger towards compassion. There will be more occasions where you show compassion and you will also have more stability, so it will take stronger negative events to produce anger from you.

Please correct me if I'm wrong!

Sounds good, but If I want to have positive feelings/thoughts and live a more positive/optimistic life, then what? What do I do? How do I change my thought processes to become more positive/optimistic?

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Mindfulness meditation applied to cognitive therapy
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2013, 11:51:33 PM »
By lessening your grasp on negativity.

 

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