Author Topic: Bridging your "minds".  (Read 2204 times)

Dharmic Tui

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Bridging your "minds".
« on: November 02, 2012, 09:12:12 PM »
You'll have to excuse me for not using pali terms, but through my practice I have managed to form a very clear distinction between my two modes of mental experience:

My doing mind - this is the "thinking" mode of mind. It's where I ruminate, dwell, plan, fear, love, etc. It's what brought me into practice in the first instance, because I'd made it quite the convoluted mess throughout a protracted period of upheaval. More often than not when I am in this mode of mind I gravitate towards a very dark or unpleasant vedena.

My being mind - this is where I/we go when meditating or in moments of lucidity. I feel free and uncomplicated, open to anything and everything, without judging or thinking about it. It sort of reminds me faintly of what the child me was like, where you'd just do things without concern of the consequences.

I'm no doubt bringing up a point of discussion or debate that's central to Buddhism and Vipassana, but how do you go about bridging these worlds? It's like I'm almost two totally different people, and finding a middle ground is extremely difficult. If I move from my being mind to my doing mind, within a short period I'm often back at square one, overly critical and full of negative self talk. Every time I'm in my being mind, I feel like I've finally cracked the riddle, and it's all plain sailing, then I slip into my doing mind and I become full of despair that I'll never break out of this cycle.

I presume some of this is based on time, some of it's just the reality of a human mind, but any direction (or reading material) would be appreciated.

CameronJ

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Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2012, 12:07:35 AM »
Hi. I think you're right that it just takes time meditating to slowly temper that "doing mind". By bringing more awareness into your activities, your "being mind" starts to take root in areas that it hasn't typically been present. And by mindfully approaching activities that tend to cause you upheaval when you're feeling lucid, you can also undermine the power of those activities over you. Wu Wei is an interesting Taoist concept that represents the integration of action and non-action. You might find this description of it useful:

http://taoism.about.com/od/wuwei/a/wuwei.htm

Anyway, when we keep meditating consistently, indications of liberation appear when we least expect them. This dualism of doing vs. being might just be an afterthought to you in no time.

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #2 on: November 06, 2012, 09:17:27 AM »
Thanks for your words CameronJ. I think you're right, and it will be down to time, part of the do-er in me wants to think there's such a thing as a complete answer to this question when the reality is there is no confined end point, just greater and greater degrees of attentiveness and mindfullness.

Its funny, when I started this road I didn't fully comprehend how true Jack Kornfield's analogy of meditation being like piano practice was. Over time I can definitely see a honing of my meditation and with it the spill over into my day to day living. I still struggle a little falling into my do-er mind fully so I have a ways to go, perhaps forever.

Thanks for the Wu Wei link also, I will do some more reading up.

CameronJ

  • Member
    • Sitting meditation, Hatha Yoga, also involved with Shambhala Meditation Community
Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2012, 02:41:46 AM »
Well said, Dharmic Tui. I think the same could be said of all of us honing our meditation just as we'd practice piano. I like the Jack Kornfield book title "After the Ecstacy, the Laundry"

Cheers.

Matthew

  • The Irreverent Buddhist
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  • Meditation: It's a D.I.Y. project.
    • KISS: Keep it simple stupid.
    • Getting nowhere slowly and enjoying every moment.
Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2012, 07:30:25 AM »
Try doing the dishes whilst in being mind mode. It's a good start. Shopping at the supermarket can also be done the same way "shopping meditation". Meditation in action is core to the tradition in which I started my practice. This included Kado ("The way of the flower") AKA flower-arranging meditation, Kyudo ("The way of the Bow") AKA archery-meditation, Caligraphy .... and well actually everything.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

Dharmic Tui

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Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2012, 01:23:07 AM »
I've been engaging more and more in mind mode over this past week, and it's been interesting. I wonder whether it is possible to be in that mode almost all the time. I imagine that's probably what some envisage true enlightenment to be.

Matthew

  • The Irreverent Buddhist
  • Staff
  • Meditation: It's a D.I.Y. project.
    • KISS: Keep it simple stupid.
    • Getting nowhere slowly and enjoying every moment.
Re: Bridging your "minds".
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2012, 09:30:35 AM »
Being in that mode all the time is fully possible. It is not enlightenment but it's a step on the path.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

 

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