Author Topic: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???  (Read 12582 times)

Jeeprs

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2011, 12:29:08 AM »
I am  familiar with the Milinda-panna. But notice that the translator has interpolated the term 'no soul' throughout this passage. I don't agree with that interpolation.  The word 'soul' has no counterpart in Pali or Sanskrit. The Sanskrit equivalent would be 'atma' which simply means 'self'. I understand the Buddhist opposition to the 'atmavada'. But I still don't agree with this interpolation 'no soul'. This doesn't imply the opposite, either  - that there is a soul. Remember the Buddha's response to Vachagotta on the question of whether there is a self - neither 'yes' nor 'no'. The 'no soul' phrase is a definite 'no'.

I think the point of Nagasena's argument is to demonstrate the falsehood of being attached to one's sense of identity.  But this argument can also easily lead to a nihilist view.

On the other forum that I post to, the materialists also say there is no soul. Why? Because they say that human beings are a completely natural outcome of material interactions, formed by evolution and whatever physical processes have lead to living beings. At death, the elements disintegrate, and that is the end of it. There is no soul (which they think is just a superstition) and no life beyond this one. Accordingly, they think dharma is simply a social convention, and karma a myth to keep the masses in control. The atheist interpreters of Dharma, like Stephen Batchelor, dispute the notion of karma and rebirth for exactly this reason. They say it is interposed on the 'original teaching'. I say the opposite - that this materialist notion of 'no soul' is actually what is being interposed. It is not what the teaching means.

In the Buddhist tradition, it is understood that an individual life unfolds over many lifetimes (hence Dusko's original question). Remember the categorization of disciples in the Theravada tradition - never-returner, once returner, and stream-winner? This explicitly recognizes the process of re-birth, and the idea of karma playing itself out over lifetimes. What is the mechanism by which karma propagates through lifetimes? There is no easy answer to that question. In fact I don't think the Theravada tries to answer it, it simply assumes it. The Buddhist school that really worked out a detailed description of this whole process was the Yogācāra, who found it necessary to introduce concepts such as the ālaya-vijñāna in order to provide the basis for the process.

Philosophically, we can distinguish between a substance-view and a process-view. It is mistaken to think of 'soul' or 'atma'  - whether you accept it or not - as a substance or an entity. In the Buddhist view of rebirth, there is a process which plays itself out over many lifetimes. There is not a substance which undergoes the process, there is only the process.  We have become involved in this process, through craving and delusion, and therefore identify with the elements in the process, to the point that we think we are the process.  This is what Nagasena's argument is pointing to: he is trying to show us that we are identifying with all of these phenomena which are 'anatta', not-self.

Ultimately this argument leads to the doctrine of emptiness and all the Prajñāpāramitā teachings, such as the Diamond Sutra:

Quote from: Chapter 9
Buddha then asked, "What do you think, Subhuti, does one who has entered the stream which flows to Enlightenment, say 'I have entered the stream'?"

"No, Buddha", Subhuti replied. "A true disciple entering the stream would not think of themselves as a separate person that could be entering anything. Only that disciple who does not differentiate themselves from others, who has no regard for name, shape, sound, odor, taste, touch or for any quality can truly be called a disciple who has entered the stream."

Buddha continued, "Does a disciple who is subject to only one more rebirth say to himself, 'I am entitled to the honors and rewards of a Once-to-be-reborn.'?"

"No, Lord. 'Once-to-be-reborn' is only a name. There is no passing away, or coming into, existence. Only one who realizes this can really be called a disciple."

"Subhuti, does a venerable One who will never more be reborn as a mortal say to himself, 'I am entitled to the honor and rewards of a Non-returner.'?"

"No, Perfectly Enlightened One. A 'Non-returner' is merely a name. There is actually no one returning and no one not-returning."

"Tell me, Subhuti. Does a Buddha say to himself, 'I have obtained Perfect Enlightenment.'?"

"No, lord. There is no such thing as Perfect Enlightenment to obtain. If a Perfectly Enlightened Buddha were to say to himself, 'I am enlightened' he would be admitting there is an individual person, a separate self and personality, and would therefore not be a Perfectly Enlightened Buddha."

This is the 'great paradox' of the whole teaching: that awakening to the true identity is to go beyond all sense of myself, me, and mine, self and other, spirit and matter, and all of the other dualities that the 'phenomenal mind' clings to. From this viewpoint, there is indeed 'no soul' - but this is, if you like, viewed from above, from the transcendent realm, rather than from below, from the material realm. And within this material realm, if we say there is 'no soul', I still reckon we will end up falling back into materialism. We understand there is no soul by going beyond the realm of individuation, not by denying that it exists - and there is a world of difference between the two understandings.

« Last Edit: August 11, 2011, 12:36:36 AM by Jeeprs »

Andrew

  • Member
    • friends tell me things, sometimes I listen.
    • Letting Go.
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2011, 07:06:31 AM »
Nice post Jeeprs.

I've come full circle over this whole thing, I had come to the opinion that each existence was discreet and final,   and rebirth was a figurative illustration of the seemingly endless possibilities; when one got to a certain stage of being awake, the whole panarama opens up and all those experiences start flowing into a single point of consciousness, hence it seeming to the individual when they come back to everyday reality that indeed they have live all those lives.

Now i just think, yeah maybe we just lived all those lives.  :D  :D  :D

 Rebirth does help me let go of the idea that there is someone to blame, the idea that childhood shaped me. I shaped me, my continuum that is, my flame passed from life to life. I can forgive dad, mum, and others as I know they where seemlessly playing there part in my drama while i played my part in theirs in this cosmic dance of mystery.

I can even forgive God  :D Or more to the point ignore what everyone else seems to think on the subject and be at peace with whatever gets me to that 'I am That' moment. Action through inaction, Responsibility through playful disregard! irreverant disregard for the rules, entering the kingdom as a child, wide eyed, wild and innocent. Breaking whatever rule is in the way of 'that thou art'.





getting it done

Jeeprs

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2011, 07:36:10 AM »
I had a breakthrough when I was studying pre-history years ago. I was studying the origins of agriculture and animal husbandry.  I was thinking about who my distant ancestors were, on the plains of what is now Europe, for all those tens of thousands of years, or even longer. Countless generations of people were born, lived, gave birth, and died. There must have been great suffering involved, but also triumph, because if it weren't for them, I would not be here. (This also made me realize why the Chinese have reverence for ancestors.)

Anyway, one day I was thinking about these people, about who they were, and I suddenly thought  - they were all me. They were all earlier versions of this very person, with all their triumphs and tragedies and joys and woes. They all had a name, like I do, and their struggles and problems, and their loved ones, and each made their own contribution, and lived their life.

So when I came into existence, I was the inheritor of all that history - cultural, national, personal, genetic. I am just the current version of this unfolding process.

Perhaps this is just an allegorical way of picturing the idea of 'the cycle of birth and death'. It may not fit, exactly, but from the viewpoint of the modern west, it is a way of making sense of the what is otherwise a very exotic and rather scary idea. Even having that idea, made me feel a lot less alone in the world.

Morning Dew

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2011, 07:58:33 AM »

Thanks Jeepers for the second post above.

Be well

Vivek

  • Moderator
  • Staff
    • Advaita & U Ba Khin's tradition
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2011, 08:24:31 AM »
My understanding is that "atta" is the Pali equivalent of Sanskrit "atma". Note the verse "atta hi attano natho, atta hi attano gathi", which when translated to Sanskrit becomes "atma hi atmano natho, atma hi atmano gathih". Sanskrit "atma" means soul or self, depending on the context in which it is used. For example, note verse in Gita: "udharet atmanaa atmaanam"; here, "atma" is used as self - "One must raise oneself by oneself". But, note verse in Mandukya Upanishad: "ayam atma brahma", wherein, it indicates soul - "This soul is the Supreme Soul".

 I agree that "no soul" makes sense from the absolute stand-point. I think that Buddha spoke of atta/anatta depending on the context. "Atta hi attano natho" is meant as advice, so, interpretting atta as self or soul, is agreeable. So, when we come across atta in passages, it is mostly used in a relative stand-point. However, of the three marks, anatta comes the last. The practitioner starts his enquiry with anicca, whether or not whatever he comes across within the frame-work of the body is permanent. This is why Vipassana in Sayagyi U Ba Khin's tradition emphasizes on inquiring whether the body, sensations, mind and mental contents have any permanent basis or not, as the starting point. As the practitioner progresses with his understanding of anicca, he slowly moves on to the enquiry of the next mark, dukkha. Then, gradually, the practitioner moves on to the last mode of inquiry, whether there is any entity here as "I" or not. It does not help a novice practitioner to start thinking of anatta at the beginning itself. That will at the most, remain only as Chintan-maya Pannya which is helpful only to a certain extent. Anatta become Bhavana-maya Pannya only when the practitioner advances in Vipassana. So, I guess, it's OK to entertain the notion of self or soul in the beginning to intermediate stages, but not in the advanced stages of one's practice.

It is difficult to clearly establish what exactly Nagasena meant in the above illustration. But, going through how the conversation evolves with Milinda's enquiry, I am inclined to think that Nagasena is establishing "no self", rather than indicating not to have attachments to the sense of self etc. Note that Milinda's question was who Nagasena is, that is, he is dissecting what the entity called "Nagasena" is, where this entity is etc. And Nagasena's insightful answer establishes the fact that there is no entity as such, "Nagasena" is just a generally understood term for a process, a conglomeration of mind and matter. Anyway, one can interpret Nagasena's words either way. As Sankaracharya says, logic is like a double-headed sword. If you look for it, you can always find two ways to interpret the passages.

I don't think there is any reason to believe that just because Buddha was an exponent of "no soul", it makes him a nihilist. I would say, that is just the nihilists trying to read their meaning out of Buddha's words, rather than the Enlightened One supporting their views. Buddha has clearly established the purpose of human life, and Dhamma as the path to attain it. If Dhamma is interpretted as just social convention, then that is the error of those who interpret it that way. I think the root of this problem is over-intellectualizing and trying to create support for one's own beliefs. Anatta is not a concept to intellectualize, it is a fact to be experienced.       
Let's go beyond this illusion, shall we?

Jeeprs

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #30 on: August 19, 2011, 04:37:43 AM »
From a Zen blog I discovered:
Quote
The Buddha never once categorically denied the self, that is, he never denied what we are most primordially.  Where confusion enters the scene is when we try to approach self with various presuppositions.  In other words, we want to conceive self.  This conceiving of self is called âtma-mâna.  It is also a view of self (âtmadrsti) which is always the wrong view of the self insofar as the self is unviewable. 

More specifically when we conceive self it becomes something not-the-self (anâtman), or the same, it becomes an aggregate (skandha).  This aggregate then becomes attachment for us, which is suffering, since the five skandhas (pañcaskandha) are suffering (D. ii. 305), according to the Buddha.

Source

Quote
It is easy to spot the Buddhists who stumble in the dark.  They are the ones who call Buddhism a non-substance ontology or non-substantialist, these particular terms referring to the fact that the Buddha supposedly denied the atman or self, or for that matter, ultimate reality.

When Buddhists not only stumble in the dark but fall is when they attempt to lay out the Buddha’s teaching minus an absolute or transcendent self, realized through gnosis.  What they present, instead, soon begins to smell of nihilism which is the denial of transcendent reality.  This opens the door to the belief that life has no meaning.  Nihilism, I hasten to add, makes gnosis or jñâna also meaningless and not worth achieving.

Judging from the Buddhist canon, itself, the evidence is just not there that the Buddha’s awakening did not behold the absolute if by absolute we mean ultimate reality as opposed to finite, transient existence.  What he consistently taught from his gnosis, as the awakened one, is that the impermanent and suffering psychophysical body (the pañcaskandha) is not our true self.  By comparison, Buddhist who stumble in the dark; who pose a strict non-substance/absolute doctrine would teach that all is a grand illusion or mâyâ—and leave it at that.  But no such teaching exists in the canon.  Those who stumble teaching such nonsense, we may conclude, prefer darkness to the light. 
Source

Quote
When we come across such phrases as “form is not-self (anatta)” or “feeling is not-self” this is no more a denial of self than saying the engine of the automobile is not a driver.  We understand the driver to be totally different than the automobile and its various parts.  By saying form is not-self, the Buddha is simply saying the true dharma or dhamma, i.e., the self, is not one of the Five Aggregates which, incidentally, belong to Mara the Evil One.

...a lot of Buddhists have been fed inaccurate information about the role of self in Buddhism, including negation (the via negativa).  Given that Buddhism uses negation a great deal, such as the negation of the Five Aggregates which are not my self—and can never be my self, Buddhism also has a positive side which points to the absolute.  Negation works, in fact, as a surefire method by which to approach the supreme positive, namely, the absolute.

source

I am not quoting this writer because he is an authority, but only because I agree with him.

Masauwu

  • Member
    • chipping away
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #31 on: August 19, 2011, 05:01:31 AM »
But can this riddle be solved with a philosophical approach? I can live with the fact that i don`t know which is the answer until i see it myself clearly. Does it help me to form an opinion or adopt a view based on theory? I can`t tell whether it helps or it hurts, but i will not trust an answer until i perceive it directly.
The summer river:
although there is a bridge, my horse
goes through the water.

Andrew

  • Member
    • friends tell me things, sometimes I listen.
    • Letting Go.
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #32 on: August 19, 2011, 06:55:19 AM »
I think too much is made of the word 'ultimate'.

By definition no limited being will ever or ever has experienced something 'ultimate' in the strictest sense.(The  scale of universe thread is a great place to start contemplating that one!) That would be like saying if we make a triangle extremely big it will become a square! Or if I try really hard I can fit 2 litres of water in a 500ml cup. Absurd. None the less people go on believing they are experiencing ultimate truths every day.

This in itself is another definition of suffering by the way, that I can and do experience ultimate things.  I'm quite thankful that the self I perceive myself to be is not permanent, god help me if it was. I'm also thankful my experience isn't the yard stick of what is 'ultimate'. We would be completely f*cked if that were so- let me tell you!

The nature of what is beyond our experience will always be the subject of philosophy, but I think it is important to know what our view (philosophy) is. I completely agree that nothing gets 'sorted out' with philosophy, but it is without a doubt another form of observation that must be apprehended.

Denying philosophy itself does not free us from it! neither does asserting philosophical points make them anymore true. the simple fact is we are always 'philosophying' whether we like it or not. Sort of like breathing, it just keeps going whether we are paying attention or not!

I'm inclined to believe (philosophy alert) that Right View comes at the beginning of the list as without having a direction to head in, we will indeed 'find' whatever it is we hold to be true. So angels will appear to some and aliens to others depending on those views being held. If we deny the power of these initial thought seeds ( like holding the thought: There absolutely is no ultimate self) that will grow a tree of nihilism without a doubt. There is a knifes edge to walk here so we should tread lightly! I know that a small grin comes to my face when i think of letting go of this limited self. Either I am already a complete nihilist, or that glimmer of joy is a reflection of something worth letting go for! Ajahn brahm said something interesting the other day, "We let some things go, but we don't throw them away" he was talking about family and friends. I think that we need this feeling for our sense of self as well; any harshness and dogmatic 'there is no self' is sure to walk right over the subtle truth in between.

 




 
« Last Edit: August 19, 2011, 07:00:11 AM by Andrew »
getting it done

Jeeprs

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #33 on: August 19, 2011, 09:01:32 AM »
Yes, all good points. But I think there is a very common nihilist misinterpretation of 'anatta'. The distinction can be expressed very easily: 'nothing is self' does not equal 'there is no self (or that 'Buddhism teaches there is no soul'  :(.)  One book in particular recommended by one of the teachers at my course was Early Buddhism: The I of the Beholder by Sue Hamilton Blyth.  Getting it out shortly.

Masauwu

  • Member
    • chipping away
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #34 on: August 19, 2011, 03:04:06 PM »
A brief addition to my previous post (prompted while watching one of Adyashanti`s videos): there is a subtle power in accepting i don`t know something. The mind tries to make up its mind about a subject you have under scrutiny. You opened a file cabinet for this subject and your zealous servant - the mind - cannot leave this empty; it must put something in it. That is the default operating system settting.

But you are no longer an inexperienced user of that operating system. You peaked inside the .ini and .cfg files and can edit them now. You can choose to accept that the file cabinet can be empty until something worthy to put in it shows up. Or grow flowers or tomatoes in it in the meantime. :)
The summer river:
although there is a bridge, my horse
goes through the water.

Andrew

  • Member
    • friends tell me things, sometimes I listen.
    • Letting Go.
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #35 on: August 20, 2011, 05:41:56 AM »
Cool post Masauwu, very insightful. The mind is a file system server, but lacks a competent user!  :D
getting it done

Jeeprs

  • Guest
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #36 on: August 20, 2011, 11:17:11 AM »
Wish there was an 'I agree' button, but there isn't, so: I agree. :D

alanStark

  • Member
  • Write something about yourself here
    • None
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #37 on: November 01, 2015, 10:18:35 AM »
I vaguely remember a story about Buddgha where a kid's parents, on being distraught about the whereabouts of their dead son, were shown his son in another dimension living happily by the buddha. If there is no self, who did the Buddha show to the dead kid's parents?

And has anybody ever seen the truthm except the Buddha? If not, what is the use of spirituality, if it can't be attained.

Who is to be believed; the abrahamic religions, buddhism or hinduism?

Some crorection is in order here:
The self and the soul are not the same thing. The soul is the battery that drives the body. The self is a higher brain function of the pre-frontal cortex. Hence, they are conmpletely unrelated concepts. The self dies in most religions, but the battery, the soul seems to continue.

Now, the battery has different views in buddhism and hinduism. While hinduism believes that the battery is unique to each person, buddhism believes that it is just energy that keeps getting consumed and dissipated, hence no countable battery in us, instead a regular exchange of energy, just like a lightbulb consumes electricity; no part of electicity can be said to be the light in the lightbulb.

Ben-meijer

  • Member
  • Who are you?
    • Vipassana - goenkha
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #38 on: March 26, 2017, 08:02:37 PM »
Why? What is the use of the hair splitting?

Im a therapist, have spent some time with people who regress others to past lives when usefull (hypnotherapy). I work with psychics and have them as friends. When usefull, cleaning up traumas in past lives or with ancestors is used.
When trying to help somebody resolve a fear issue, and resolving it through resolving a past life trauma succesfully, nobody ever asks, was that my soul, my personality, my ego, or something else?
Just get the job done. Leave philosophy to the arm chair philosophers who will spend a lot of time trying to disproving it's  possibility.

dont forget, every one of us identifies a me, mine and I, and we dont really like conflicting parts... but acknowleding there are parts is genius, and als helps me in therapy.

soul? Ego, Personality, something else? I dont know... .

I have seen past life experiences.

to me semantics are irrelevant.

 I dont know, and frankly ... until it actually becomes important, why should I care?

Middleway

  • Staff
  • Just be a witness.
    • Vipassana as taught by Mr. Goenka - Switched to Shamatha
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #39 on: March 31, 2017, 02:25:03 AM »
soul? Ego, Personality, something else? I dont know... .

I have seen past life experiences.

to me semantics are irrelevant.

 I dont know, and frankly ... until it actually becomes important, why should I care?

Realizing your true nature is what ultimately sets you free. Contemplating on the question "who am I" leads to realization.
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Ben-meijer

  • Member
  • Who are you?
    • Vipassana - goenkha
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #40 on: March 31, 2017, 11:35:12 AM »
Liberation from all the shackles, bonds, from the whole wheel is the goal, not just realising your nature.
Of course, any one of us could state, that meditating on who am is is THE way, the best way, the only way, or whatever.

My goal is freeing myself and others from misery and suffering, all caused by the being in this earth plane.

To me, EFT, TAT, and other therapeutic techniques are just fine as techniques. Not perfect, but very usefull and quite good at achieving a greater liberation.
Combined with doing Vipassana, I get a deeper effect, more liberation.
 

Nicky

  • Member
    • Pali
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #41 on: April 02, 2017, 11:20:27 AM »
Im a therapist, have spent some time with people who regress others to past lives when usefull (hypnotherapy).

Its interesting how people who need therapy claim to experience past lives where as those who have spent their life calmly meditating only experience mental formations (sankhara).

My goal is freeing myself and others from misery and suffering, all caused by the being in this earth plane.

Buddhism explains misery & suffering is caused by craving, attachment & self-view rather than living on this earth.

 ::)

Ben-meijer

  • Member
  • Who are you?
    • Vipassana - goenkha
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #42 on: April 02, 2017, 08:26:29 PM »
Hi Nicky,

yes, to me the reincarnation phenomenon is interesting. If hypnotherapists can regress people easily, and I have seen it, with good results regarding the issues they regressed people for, why have so many meditators never reached that stage?
It remains a question. It is for each person to look in the mirror themselves.
I have seen some previous lives, (no fun and games, but how I died). One was spontaneous dream after wondering where the pain in my heart came from. Detailed information,  but this regression business is not a real goal, it is a means for clearing samskaras. I have cleared several others with therapists.

As I look at the goal of purifying the mind, liberating oneself from the bonds and shackels which are caused by samsakras and karma.... any method is fair game as long as it is ethical and wholesome. Why only meditate?

 

Nicky

  • Member
    • Pali
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #43 on: April 03, 2017, 12:43:28 AM »
I have seen some previous lives, (no fun and games, but how I died). One was spontaneous dream...why have so many meditators never reached that stage? 

In Buddhism, these are called mental formations or mental images, just as when the mind dreams at night.

Meditators can reach the same stage but meditators classify mental formations as 'mental formations' rather than as 'past lives'.

 ::)

stillpointdancer

  • stillpointdancer
  • Member
  • Retired teacher, deepening understanding of Dharma
    • Insight meditation
    • Exploring the results of 30 years of meditating
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #44 on: April 03, 2017, 11:03:57 AM »
I don't think there is any soul to reincarnate, but that things arise on conditions. Otherwise you get an eternal 'soul', which I don't buy into. As to previous lives, I think the brain is perfectly capable of 'creating' any number of alternate selves, which can sometimes arise spontaneously while meditating, or in some kind of regression therapy. In reality they are mental formations and are to be wondered at rather than taken seriously as evidence of reincarnation.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

dharma bum

  • Moderator
  • Certified Zen Master (second degree black belt)
    • vipassana
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #45 on: April 04, 2017, 03:42:22 AM »
Agreed with stillpointsancer and Nicky. With my night dreams, I can usually find some sort of explanation - they are usually connected to something that happened to me, or something I was thinking about. Once in a while, when I meditate, I reach a state (rare to me) during which I see stuff that seem completely foreign and disconnected with anything from my experience. If you're a believer in rebirth, you could possibly convince yourself that these are visions from your past lives. Much as I would like to believe in rebirth, my own opinion is that it is really something more prosaic. It's your brain shuffling images and sounds and memories around, not unlike what happens in sleep.
Mostly ignorant

Ben-meijer

  • Member
  • Who are you?
    • Vipassana - goenkha
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #46 on: April 04, 2017, 06:29:19 PM »
Well,

Any one of you can have this opinion. I did not ask for your opinion on my experiences, and I dont care about your opinion either way, as It only says something about you. You are people who judge and doubt.

Good luck with that.






Matthew

  • The Irreverent Buddhist
  • Staff
  • Meditation: It's a D.I.Y. project.
    • KISS: Keep it simple stupid.
    • Getting nowhere slowly and enjoying every moment.
Re: What (Who) Is Reincarnating???
« Reply #47 on: April 04, 2017, 09:23:01 PM »
Ben-Meijer,

The Buddha's teachings on this are clear. Insight into previous births is a direct knowledge that comes at an advanced stage on the path, after mastering at least the lower four Jahnas.

It is easy to label something then get defensive about your labeling being challenged. This says something about your ego - as does the way you interpret these arisings.

Stay calm and keep practicing,

Matthew
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~