Author Topic: Why do you meditate?  (Read 11229 times)

Andrew

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2011, 01:38:12 PM »
Hi gregor, Welcome!

love
andy
getting it done

Morning Dew

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2011, 02:01:51 PM »
Hi Gregor :)

Welcome to the forum my friend. Looking forward to getting to know you better.

Be well.

Dusko

Matthew

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2011, 06:03:58 PM »
In case anyone is confused Gregor registered a while ago but has refrained from posting til now (the forum is still closed to new members).

Welcome Gregor :)
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Anglepen

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2011, 03:46:00 PM »
My first post here too for along while.

I meditate because I want something to still my hectic mind, and to hopefully, one day, understand what life is all about.

I also find it grounds me nicely whilst also allowing my mind to soar.

Regards
Kev

Crystal Palace

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2011, 05:29:10 PM »
Hello Kev  :)
"Abstain from unwholesome actions,
Perform wholesome actions,
Purify your mind"

Buddha

Morning Dew

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2011, 05:34:50 PM »
Kev, thanks for joining us on this epic journey my friend :)

May you be happy and free from suffering

Ben-meijer

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #31 on: March 26, 2017, 07:21:27 PM »
I meditate (vipassana-goenkha) because it works, as a useable and dependable tool towards the necessary development to get myself and others out of the wheel of rebirth (liberation).  I did not say the only tool. More about that later. 
Vipassana does aleviate sanskaras, or stuck emotions if you will call them that, at the root level.
I believe Robert "bob"Monroe got a good explanation of how the wheel works, and how people get stuck and are unable to achieve escape velocity needed to leave the earth plane. (for those interested, you can view this info here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEMzONZupCA
Vipassana is a great way to remove load factor, and increase your velocity.

My experience is that vipassana does remove the roots of issues. I had already treated a lot of issues with EFT, TAT, and other techniques... but the roots...by doing ana pana, and taking the time to feel, more subtle, more gentle... I did get to the root.


Eklavya

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #32 on: April 04, 2017, 10:24:35 AM »
Hi,

I meditate daily because it is the only thing that helps me maintain a equilibrium amidst the daily chaos I witness at my workplace. It helps me grounded on the true realities of life and be a witness of the drama that is going on. Since, in today's age it is really difficult to live in-person under the guidance of a guru, the practice of meditation acts as a Guru to me.

Regards,

Meditate Daily. Be Calm.

stillpointdancer

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #33 on: April 04, 2017, 11:42:52 AM »
I started to meditate as an experiment, to see if I could change how I perceived the world. That was thirty years ago. I carried on meditating because it worked.
“You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet, still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet.” Franz Kafka

Matthew

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    • Getting nowhere slowly and enjoying every moment.
Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #34 on: April 04, 2017, 09:19:37 PM »
Quote
My experience is that vipassana does remove the roots of issues

This has a very specific meaning in Buddhist understanding "to cut the roots" is in relation to the final end of greed, ill-will and ignorance. It is the end of a process and near to the point of obtaining final release. You are cutting relative roots, not absolutely cutting the roots that lead to these relative arisings.
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~

dharma bum

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #35 on: April 05, 2017, 03:27:04 AM »
i forget why i went on my first 10-day retreat organized by the Goenka organization. it might have been simply curiosity. i had a minor moment of enlightenment when i had an insight into a personal problem i was grappling with. i looked up and noted that i was standing under a kanchan tree. (trees are indispensible for enlightenment).

i found that meditation freed me from anxiety, anger and filled me with peace. over the course of the years, i have become a less anxious person, less fearful and kinder and more compassionate (though sometimes i have my doubts). the many years of meditation have also made me aware of how my mind works and this had made me wiser and humbler, which is often the same thing.

unlike many people here, i don't really believe in nirvana or enlightenment. i meditate to live a balanced and more fulfilling life.
Mostly ignorant

Vishal

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #36 on: April 05, 2017, 04:31:19 AM »
Why do you (we) meditate?

The Answer lies in What happens when we don't meditate.

Remember being - unaware and asleep, disconnected and disillusioned, stressful and miserable, defiled and vulnerable, wrong actions & bad intentions, lustful & empty,  egoistic and ignorant, chained and attached and a lot more.

Right Meditation leads to - Focus & Concentration - being Aware and Awake - absence of ignorance & defilements in actions - No passion and aversion - Peacefulness & Happiness - complete understanding of mind and body - leads to Wisdom - and then to Freedom (Nirvana).

The other question was about Nirvana.

We all may agree that Nirvana does not need any approvals or beliefs from us to exist and not exist. It is something to be reached and experienced by an individual. All the experiences can be expressed, shared and told about but this is the only unique one which can't be expressed or explained as it lies beyond the normal sensory dimension of mind and body as experience by the Buddha.

To reach nirvana the ultimate truth we need to go through the truths about mind and body and then beyond it. The great masters and elders have done it and have told us all about it. Right meditation/practice is the path which leads to Nirvana and that's why we should do it.


 
« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 04:33:22 AM by Vishal »

kcarneglia

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #37 on: April 07, 2017, 09:06:54 PM »
Hi there,
I think the reason each person meditates is probably personal to them. For me, it was the start of going down a spiritual road and hoping to one day find what some call Enlightenment, Christ Consciousness, Buddha Consciousness, etc. Another big draw was the increased compassion for all living things, but I also meditate because it has practical purposes (better sleep, more energy, and general feelings of being more focused for starters).

I can't say whether I've found that "enlightened" state or ever really will, but I have learned a good deal about myself and the world in the process. For that matter, I've also begun to realize that we don't need to seek Enlightenment but rather let it come towards us as we continue in our spiritual journey. Hope this helps! You can always message me directly on here if you want to discuss more.

Sincerely,
Kevin Carneglia
Owner, <<Moderator edit: Kevin, don't use links to your websites again.>> 
« Last Edit: April 11, 2017, 06:32:37 AM by Vivek »
Personal info removed. Read forum rules.- Moderator.

Middleway

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #38 on: April 08, 2017, 01:03:12 AM »
We meditate to train the mind so that it is able to concentrate and develop/establish mindfulness. We have to train the mind to gain proficiency on both at the same time. If I try to concentrate on the tip of my nose without developing mindfulness, my mind will go into a hypnotic state. This is the reason we should use a much coarser (like the whole body breathing) object of meditation to concentrate on. Second, by focusing our attention of the breathing sensations throughout the body, we will calm the entire body which in turn calms the mind. Having a calmer mind is more conducive for establishment of mindfulness.

As we progress with our training of the mind as above, we can move onto concentrating on our mental formations (thoughts, anger, lust, hate etc.). After establishing strong mindfulness and ability to concentrate, we are able to notice the inner workings of the mind. We notice how our mind divides itself into subject (you, the observer) and object of meditation whether it is breathing sensations or mental formations. In fact, the object of meditation such as sensations from breathing is also a mental formation. Mind has to process the stimuli from the body and form a mental formation of breathing sensation. So, there are only mental formations (of the mind arising) and nothing else. Our mind arises as breathing sensation (mental formation) and then arises as "you/me" (feeling of "I") to observe it. The mind arises (takes form as these mental formations) one at a time. So, there is only mind arising (as object of meditation or as observer) and falling away. If one cannot notice this, they did not achieve strong mindfulness and focused concentration (of mind).  So we train by meditating.
Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Laurent

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #39 on: April 08, 2017, 10:25:34 AM »
We meditate to train the mind so that it is able to concentrate and develop/establish mindfulness. We have to train the mind to gain proficiency on both at the same time. If I try to concentrate on the tip of my nose without developing mindfulness, my mind will go into a hypnotic state. This is the reason we should use a much coarser (like the whole body breathing) object of meditation to concentrate on. Second, by focusing our attention of the breathing sensations throughout the body, we will calm the entire body which in turn calms the mind. Having a calmer mind is more conducive for establishment of mindfulness.

As we progress with our training of the mind as above, we can move onto concentrating on our mental formations (thoughts, anger, lust, hate etc.). After establishing strong mindfulness and ability to concentrate, we are able to notice the inner workings of the mind. We notice how our mind divides itself into subject (you, the observer) and object of meditation whether it is breathing sensations or mental formations. In fact, the object of meditation such as sensations from breathing is also a mental formation. Mind has to process the stimuli from the body and form a mental formation of breathing sensation. So, there are only mental formations (of the mind arising) and nothing else. Our mind arises as breathing sensation (mental formation) and then arises as "you/me" (feeling of "I") to observe it. The mind arises (takes form as these mental formations) one at a time. So, there is only mind arising (as object of meditation or as observer) and falling away. If one cannot notice this, they did not achieve strong mindfulness and focused concentration (of mind).  So we train by meditating.

Could you explain us, preferabily on a dedicated topic, like this one: http://www.vipassanaforum.net/forum/index.php?topic=3209.msg32980;topicseen#new, why  meditating on the area at the exit of the nostrills (or like you said the tip of the nose (!)), could lead to hypnotic states and how meditating on a larger area, for example the whole body, could not lead to hypnotic states.
Also, what do you want to say by hypnotic states? Do you want to say that one is not aware of everything but just the object of meditation he focuses to? Like the buddha described in some verses?

"'I was here, brother.' 'Yet, Lord, did you not see it?' 'I did not see it, brother.' 'But the noise, Lord, you surely heard?' 'I did not hear it, brother.' Then that man asked me: 'Then, Lord, perhaps you slept?' 'No, brother, I was not sleeping.' 'Then, Lord, you were conscious?' 'I was, brother.' Then that man said: 'Then, Lord, while conscious and awake, in the midst of a heavy rain, with thunder rolling, lightning flashing, and thunderbolts crashing, you neither saw it nor heard the noise?' And I answered him, saying: 'I did not, brother.'

I am also curious to know how ypu are able to be aware of the whole body by observing only respiration.Is there any breath that pass through the tip of the toes?
Also, after reading the mahasatipatthana, could you say that the buddha taught only attention to breath and nothing else?


Middleway

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #40 on: April 08, 2017, 04:22:47 PM »
Could you explain us, preferabily on a dedicated topic, like this one: http://www.vipassanaforum.net/forum/index.php?topic=3209.msg32980;topicseen#new, why  meditating on the area at the exit of the nostrills (or like you said the tip of the nose (!)), could lead to hypnotic states and how meditating on a larger area, for example the whole body, could not lead to hypnotic states.
Also, what do you want to say by hypnotic states? Do you want to say that one is not aware of everything but just the object of meditation he focuses to? Like the buddha described in some verses?

"'I was here, brother.' 'Yet, Lord, did you not see it?' 'I did not see it, brother.' 'But the noise, Lord, you surely heard?' 'I did not hear it, brother.' Then that man asked me: 'Then, Lord, perhaps you slept?' 'No, brother, I was not sleeping.' 'Then, Lord, you were conscious?' 'I was, brother.' Then that man said: 'Then, Lord, while conscious and awake, in the midst of a heavy rain, with thunder rolling, lightning flashing, and thunderbolts crashing, you neither saw it nor heard the noise?' And I answered him, saying: 'I did not, brother.'

I am also curious to know how ypu are able to be aware of the whole body by observing only respiration.Is there any breath that pass through the tip of the toes?
Also, after reading the mahasatipatthana, could you say that the buddha taught only attention to breath and nothing else?
The other thread you are referring to is a bit loud right now. I will answer your question about hypnosis a bit later when it quiets down over there. For now, I want to focus on what I am saying as to why do we meditate.

1. To train the mind to be able to concentrate and establish mindfulness.
2. To progressively select more subtle objects of meditation as we continue to develop these two faculties of the mind (concentration and mindfulness).
3. To eventually focus on the rise and fall of the mind to understand its inner workings.
4. To directly "see" the nature of the mind. How it arises and passes away from moment to moment.
5. By seeing the nature of the mind in this way, gain insight into what causes the mind to suffer. How mind attaches itself to the mental formation of ego-self (feeling of I am) and becomes the illusory observer. How this illusion then propagates the division within the mind to form subject and object (note both are mental formations).
6. By directly seeing what causes the mind to suffer, this insight allows the mind to let go (of the attachment).
7. Mind then sets itself free of the samsakaras by cutting the roots of its attachment.

Do you see how the mind arises and falls away (and then arises again) during the sittings?

Warm regards,

Middleway

Take everything I say with a grain of salt.

Laurent

  • Member
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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #41 on: April 09, 2017, 12:41:38 PM »
Could you explain us, preferabily on a dedicated topic, like this one: http://www.vipassanaforum.net/forum/index.php?topic=3209.msg32980;topicseen#new, why  meditating on the area at the exit of the nostrills (or like you said the tip of the nose (!)), could lead to hypnotic states and how meditating on a larger area, for example the whole body, could not lead to hypnotic states.
Also, what do you want to say by hypnotic states? Do you want to say that one is not aware of everything but just the object of meditation he focuses to? Like the buddha described in some verses?

"'I was here, brother.' 'Yet, Lord, did you not see it?' 'I did not see it, brother.' 'But the noise, Lord, you surely heard?' 'I did not hear it, brother.' Then that man asked me: 'Then, Lord, perhaps you slept?' 'No, brother, I was not sleeping.' 'Then, Lord, you were conscious?' 'I was, brother.' Then that man said: 'Then, Lord, while conscious and awake, in the midst of a heavy rain, with thunder rolling, lightning flashing, and thunderbolts crashing, you neither saw it nor heard the noise?' And I answered him, saying: 'I did not, brother.'

I am also curious to know how ypu are able to be aware of the whole body by observing only respiration.Is there any breath that pass through the tip of the toes?
Also, after reading the mahasatipatthana, could you say that the buddha taught only attention to breath and nothing else?
The other thread you are referring to is a bit loud right now. I will answer your question about hypnosis a bit later when it quiets down over there. For now, I want to focus on what I am saying as to why do we meditate.

1. To train the mind to be able to concentrate and establish mindfulness.
2. To progressively select more subtle objects of meditation as we continue to develop these two faculties of the mind (concentration and mindfulness).
3. To eventually focus on the rise and fall of the mind to understand its inner workings.
4. To directly "see" the nature of the mind. How it arises and passes away from moment to moment.
5. By seeing the nature of the mind in this way, gain insight into what causes the mind to suffer. How mind attaches itself to the mental formation of ego-self (feeling of I am) and becomes the illusory observer. How this illusion then propagates the division within the mind to form subject and object (note both are mental formations).
6. By directly seeing what causes the mind to suffer, this insight allows the mind to let go (of the attachment).
7. Mind then sets itself free of the samsakaras by cutting the roots of its attachment.

Do you see how the mind arises and falls away (and then arises again) during the sittings?

Warm regards,

Middleway

You did not answer.

juntjoo

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Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #42 on: April 24, 2017, 07:27:33 PM »
Handle the pain of life and better manage my mind for all things I need it for.

Matthew

  • The Irreverent Buddhist
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  • Meditation: It's a D.I.Y. project.
    • KISS: Keep it simple stupid.
    • Getting nowhere slowly and enjoying every moment.
Re: Why do you meditate?
« Reply #43 on: April 25, 2017, 04:06:38 AM »
It works
~oOo~     Tat Tvam Asi     ~oOo~    How will you make the world a better place today?     ~oOo~    Fabricate Nothing     ~oOo~