Meditation Forum

Vipassana Meditation Forum => Meditation, Practice And The Path => Topic started by: Sprocket on May 21, 2020, 03:45:41 AM

Title: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Sprocket on May 21, 2020, 03:45:41 AM
Hello,

My 83 year old father has recently taken an interest in meditating. I have been trying to find relaxing meditation, about 15 minutes long for him to meditate with the rest of the family every night. I have been using the CD 'Sakshi Meditation: the Art of Living' so far, and he liked it, but I am trying to find others.

But I am at a loss as to finding other good meditations for my father. He would prefer just music, as he is mostly deaf and cannot hear words well, but does not mind a meditation with voices. I have tried finding apps that would work, but they are almost entirely talking with no music and focus on falling asleep when you're already in bed.

Does anyone have any suggestions that would help?
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Matthew on May 21, 2020, 10:01:53 AM
Hi Sprocket,

You could print the pdf of the Shamatha/Vipassana meditation instructions from the homepage for your father to read, and try this meditation without music. It is a method written in non religious language that anyone can understand.

I can't recommend any music for you - I don't find music beneficial to the cultivation of practice, so don't have any recommendations for that.

In the Dhamma,

Matthew
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Dhamma on May 22, 2020, 02:36:57 AM
Listening to music during meditation is hotly debated in the Buddhist world.  I will say that in genuine vipassana meditation, we do not listen to music. Is it possible, though, that *certain* kinds of music are okay in some meditative contexts....perhaps.  I am not like Yuttadhammo Bikkhu, who thinks music is nothing but a hindrance in all circumstances. Yes, music can be a huge attachment and distraction for sure, but it may be acceptable in a a few contexts.

Anyways, I am sorry for not being completely on topic. :(
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Guillaume on May 22, 2020, 07:49:58 PM
Regarding music, I'm very sensitive to it (we all are actually). It helps at the beginning I think, it sorts of covers our own mind noises. But once we train to quiet our mind, music becomes the noise, so it's better to leave it as well.

But to help relax, maybe nature sounds? There are plenty of them on youtube.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Katia on May 24, 2020, 12:33:49 AM
I would think music could sort of be its own sort of meditation, in a way.  If one's aim is to focus on something intensely as meditation.  It's obviously not vipassana, but sure, a person could focus on the music-- its structure, its rhythm, its harmonies (this may be easiest/most of interest to someone who is musically-inclined).  It would, I suppose, be a sort of mindfulness.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Dhamma on May 24, 2020, 01:42:15 AM
I would think music could sort of be its own sort of meditation, in a way.  If one's aim is to focus on something intensely as meditation.  It's obviously not vipassana, but sure, a person could focus on the music-- its structure, its rhythm, its harmonies (this may be easiest/most of interest to someone who is musically-inclined).  It would, I suppose, be a sort of mindfulness.

I think you could use certain music for certain types of meditation (concentration, seeing music as "just" sound) . If you're using it for daydreaming or hypnosis, it's no longer going to qualify as any kind of correct or proper Buddhist meditation technique.

I agree with Matthew and Guillaume in the fact that music is more likely to be a hindrance and obstacle in meditation (and can create greater attachments), even though I think they are some proper meditations that could incorporate certain kinds of music for mindfulness/concentration benefits. That said, mantras and OM chanting are perfectly fine.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: stillpointdancer on May 24, 2020, 11:18:43 AM
Hello,

My 83 year old father has recently taken an interest in meditating. I have been trying to find relaxing meditation, about 15 minutes long for him to meditate with the rest of the family every night. I have been using the CD 'Sakshi Meditation: the Art of Living' so far, and he liked it, but I am trying to find others.

But I am at a loss as to finding other good meditations for my father. He would prefer just music, as he is mostly deaf and cannot hear words well, but does not mind a meditation with voices. I have tried finding apps that would work, but they are almost entirely talking with no music and focus on falling asleep when you're already in bed.

Does anyone have any suggestions that would help?
Music is fine when you are at a stage where you need music. I have often meditated to rock music, but whatever music is needed is 'right'. It takes time for the brain to settle into meditation- weeks, months, even years. Eventually you can get to a stage where you don't need music any more, or counting the breath, or whatever. Another reason I used music is because I have tinnitus, and until I could find a way of fading it out while I meditated then some background noise was useful.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: dharma bum on May 24, 2020, 04:29:08 PM
Music doesn't work for me because music causes emotions and feelings. But if you expand the meaning of music to include bird-song, or the sounds trees makes on account of the wind, then an awareness of those sounds work for me in walks in parks or forest areas.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Dhamma on May 24, 2020, 06:41:56 PM
Music doesn't work for me because music causes emotions and feelings. But if you expand the meaning of music to include bird-song, or the sounds trees makes on account of the wind, then an awareness of those sounds work for me in walks in parks or forest areas.

Gotcha! 

I agree, more or less, with that you're saying.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: Dhamma on May 24, 2020, 06:45:48 PM
Music is fine when you are at a stage where you need music. I have often meditated to rock music, but whatever music is needed is 'right'. It takes time for the brain to settle into meditation- weeks, months, even years. Eventually you can get to a stage where you don't need music any more, or counting the breath, or whatever. Another reason I used music is because I have tinnitus, and until I could find a way of fading it out while I meditated then some background noise was useful.

And, I understand this view as well. There are cases when certain kinds of music in certain meditations can be perfectly acceptable.

We just want to avoid attachment, distraction and something that evokes strong emotions.

 :)
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: stillpointdancer on May 25, 2020, 10:54:55 AM
Music is fine when you are at a stage where you need music. I have often meditated to rock music, but whatever music is needed is 'right'. It takes time for the brain to settle into meditation- weeks, months, even years. Eventually you can get to a stage where you don't need music any more, or counting the breath, or whatever. Another reason I used music is because I have tinnitus, and until I could find a way of fading it out while I meditated then some background noise was useful.

And, I understand this view as well. There are cases when certain kinds of music in certain meditations can be perfectly acceptable.

We just want to avoid attachment, distraction and something that evokes strong emotions.

 :)

You are right. Some music is too emotive. Strangely, some classical music is very distracting in this way, although people can be a bit snobbish about it. On the other hand some music can be energising, bringing something to the meditation if that's what you need.
Title: Re: Meditating for the deaf
Post by: dharma bum on May 25, 2020, 02:32:27 PM
Indian classical music especially the sitar tends to be associated with yoga, meditation and things like that. But in fact Indian classical music operates in rhythmic cycles that build tension and expectation that gets resolved at the end of a cycle. I'm not sure - maybe it suits some people for meditation. For me, I can get too immersed in the music. But sometimes, if the mind is too scattered then slow rhythmic cycles can help in restoring some order and calming down. It can be good for sleep, for instance. But in my mind, meditation is mostly about quiet and silence, rather than the processing of the music. But I can see that if part of the mind is engaged in the music, it lets the other parts of the mind calm down, so I sort of understand why people can meditate to music.