Meditation Forum

Vipassana Meditation Forum => Meditation, Practice And The Path => Topic started by: SFStudent on September 09, 2008, 12:44:38 AM

Title: Spirit Sensitivity and Vipassana Meditation??
Post by: SFStudent on September 09, 2008, 12:44:38 AM
Hi,

I started Vipassana Meditation about a year ago.  Unfortunately, I have not kept up with the practice as I was told to (1 hour in the morning, 1 hour at night).  However, I try and meditate about 20 minutes/30 minutes per day. 

Recently, I moved to a different home and shortly found out that a spirit was inhabiting the house.  The spirit let his presence know as time went by and I recognize that while meditating, I am more aware of its presence while meditating (e.g. things get louder).   I've stopped meditating now to see whether activity in the house slows down when I stop meditating.

Has anyone faced this before?  Does one become more aware of not just self but also of other beings that may be around us while meditating?  IS this something that we can control?  For me, I would be very happy not to be "aware" of this spirit's presence any longer.  Any suggestions or thoughts about becoming more sensitive to spirits as you meditate more?
Title: Re: Spirit Sensitivity and Vipassana Meditation??
Post by: Matthew on September 11, 2008, 05:09:28 PM
Hi SFStudent,

Whether there is a spirit inhabiting your home or not it is perfectly natural for you to become more aware and sensitive during meditation. Noises sound louder, colours can be more vivid, sometimes one can experience an almost explosive increase in sensitivity.

I wouldn't worry too much about it. Try and stick to your practice and develop equanimity towards all that arises in your meditation and compassion too.

Also don't give yourself a hard time about the amount of time you sit. This is just your ego playing tricks with you telling you you are a bad meditator and etc etc ....

It can be very beneficial to do Anapana/Shamatha/Basic calming meditation 20 times a day for 5 minute sessions.

In the Dhamma,

Matthew